Figaro Boost

F

Figaro Flyer

Guest
#1
Hello everyone,
My wife has just given me permission to improve the performance of her Nissan Figaro. I belive it is the same car as a K10. It has a 1000ccTurbo

Can you replace the rear drums with discs and improve things allround i.e susspension brakes? What is the biggest micra engine I could fit?

Any suggestions would be greatly welcomed as I haven't seen any Figaros other than standard originals.
Many thanks

Daniel
 

Arnold

www.alanarnold.co.uk
Moderator
#2
No engine is a standard swap, the only alternatives are the Ma10 and Ma12 which are both less powerful than yours, and, are not fuel injected (i believe yours is).

I dont think anyone has changed the rear brakes to disks on here

Welcome to the MSC btw.
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#3
Hi Daniel.

The figaro has standard 500mmHg of boost, which is 9.7~PSI of boost. Quite reasonable really. Now I know of people who have increased the stock boost to around 14 psi. (on the March Turbos - same engine as figaro) and have rallied with this in Australia, of all places! I have not done this myself, therefor cannot recommend this or guarantee any of this information.

Rear brakes are fine. I have a Micra with more than twice the power of the Fig, and rear brakes never suffer as there is so little weight over them, the front however may need attention, but dont expect the stock fig wheels to still fit. In all honesty you may just be best to make sure the entire breaking system is A1 (dont assume so) and then fit new disks and uprated pads.

As for engine you dont have any options for anything bigger, well you have the 1200cc but it makes 65bhp, you already have 10 more than that.

You could fit K10 lowering springs and the dampers are sure to be old too, both of those would make a decent difference to over all steadyness of the car. The problem is almost any increase in power will instantly be lost via the auto transmission.
 

bombz4

Ex. Club Member
Club Member
#4
intercooler and up the boost! if the turbo will take it! should take the engine strain seen as the super turbo is ok! might be costly but im sure it would be good engine gains!
bit slow ed beat me 2 it! he knows more anyway!!!!
 
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JamieGti

Guest
#5
Hi Daniel, welcome to the MSC.
I'm quite the professional now with uprating turbo cars after completing 2 similar projects... I'd be more than happy to help you with any queries!
Uprating the front brakes on your figaro should be sufficient as the car itself is quite light. Any more strength in the rear brakes could cause the rear end to lock up with heavy braking. This will cause the car to slide sideways... I've seen this alot on the track... it's an easy mistake. So stick with the drums unless you want to set up the balance. A decent suspension setup can improve braking quite a bit, so you should look into that too.

As for uprating your turbo, it depends on how much you want to spend. I've looked into the 1000cc engine and found that you might need to spend about £1000 on it to give it reliable power!

Good luck,

-Jamie
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#6
Bombz your guessing! To install an intercooler and up the boost, you would idealy need a re-map. The fig engine is much more restrictive than the ST, so you cannot really expect the same, I have half a fig engine in the garage and the differences are quite amazing. The area on the throttle body intake is twice as large as that on the fig for a start.

FYI:
stock Fig 988cc 9.7 psi boost = 74PS
stock ST 930cc 13.5 psi boost = 110PS
It's not just the 3.8psi that gives it the 36 extra PS!
 

Ian

Ex. Club Member
#7
bombz4 said:
intercooler and up the boost! if the turbo will take it! should take the engine strain seen as the super turbo is ok! might be costly but im sure it would be good engine gains!
bit slow ed beat me 2 it! he knows more anyway!!!!
i wouldnt really compare the ST block with the figaro one since the ST block has a smaller bore and is stronger, i dont think the figaro would take the same amount of punishment.
 

bombz4

Ex. Club Member
Club Member
#8
i know i dont have much of a clue and you could probably not even use an intercooler! but there must be away to get more boost from the turbo to get a little more out of it. ive only ever messed with little old engines ive never even touched on turbos etc! but i know from silly things ive done usually if theres a will theres a way! :p
 
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ohc_turbo

Guest
#9
why would you need a remap if you upped the boost and added a intercooler? the eccs does compensate for added boost due to the airflow meter measuring more air into the engine, its only when things start maxing out the you need to think about managment ie. changing afm injectors etc.
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#10
Really simple one to answer that.

Turbo makes more boost, engine sees more power, car does not have intercooler (as far as the ecu is concerned) so ecu assumes that its intake temps will be high, and the density low. As a result the ignition is pulled back too far and there will not be enough fuel present due to the low air temps expected i.e. greater air density, and you will run into problems.
 
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JamieGti

Guest
#11
I agree with Ed, you can't just turn up the boost, add an intercooler and hope for the best. You'd need a piggy back for sure, and a bigger pump, injectors and eventually it turns into a bigger project than you origionally thought. I know, I've done it before! :(
I'm sure everyone that's done it hasn't realised how much of a task it is if you don't have the knowledge and experience. It's fairly straight forward if you've got the proper help though!
I'd say £1000 should set you an extra 20-30hp if that if you were willing to spend.

-Jamie
 
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30psi

Guest
#12
The ECCS ECU's do not make any assumptions or guess work over the intake temps.

Its purely down to the map whether the ignition is altered, on higher load.

Typically on standard boost an ECU will see approximately 70% of full load. Nissan engineered this in case of a slight increase in boost pressure (eg seized actuator).

As for 500mmHg = 9.7psi. This is wrong. 1/2 a bar of boost is 7.35psi.

So the other engine that makes 36PS is mostly down to the fact that its running 5psi more.

If someone can get hold of a Figaro turbo ECU bin file, I can open it and tell you exaclty how the ECU will deal with extra load
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#13
30psi said:
The ECCS ECU's do not make any assumptions or guess work over the intake temps.
Of course they do, even if inidirectly. Its based on lots of things such as water temp, and the amount of air coming through the MAF.

Its purely down to the map whether the ignition is altered, on higher load.
Which gets its readings from the engiene temp and the airflow voltage against RPM.

Typically on standard boost an ECU will see approximately 70% of full load. Nissan engineered this in case of a slight increase in boost pressure (eg seized actuator).
They also include too much airflow, = fuel cut, and this does not mean its then safe to increase the boost and achieve 'full load'

As for 500mmHg = 9.7psi. This is wrong. 1/2 a bar of boost is 7.35psi.
No, not trying to be deliberately rude - but I get this all the time, 1000mmHg is NOT one bar of pressure. Feel free to check this if you wish.

So the other engine that makes 36PS is mostly down to the fact that its running 5psi more.
I surpose the different cam profiles larger intake throttle body, intercooler larger turbo, and exhaust have no effect then..
 
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30psi

Guest
#14
Well that was an easy mistake to make. I haven't seen inches of mercury for some time. Easy to mix up with Kpa. Anyway I'm not here to compare different engines, but there are some incorrect facts about the ECU.

Firstly the ECU does not even think about air temps. Its not some sort of artificial intelligence advice. It purely runs off pre programmed data.

The ECU gives an output of ignition advance and injection cycle by the input from the CAS, AFM, TPS (2 parts), and water temp.

The water temp is a static adjustment, ie 20% enrichment over the whole range when at a particular temp and so on. It is actually set to have 0% adjustment at normal operating temps.

There will be spare capacity in the ECU for fueling and its probably at a bar of boost. Naturally this doesn't mean the boost can just be wacked up, but to certain degrees it will compensate. Pre ignition is caused by the hot air temps, which the ECU doesn't know, and its best to have an intercooler.

Not all the ECCS systems have a fuel cut. Only systems like the S13 and upwards have this.

You don't have to spend £1000 to get an increase of power. There are ways to introduce more fuel. The system could be run on larger injectors and quite likely could be mapped.

I have an S12 which I've increased the power from 135bhp to 237bhp. This is from a few mods on a poor engine design along with a boost increase. Now this was at the maximum the injectors could supply. That is possible due to the available fueling capacity.

So in summary... A remap isn't essential for a boost increase. Its ideal for optimum results, but not everyone has the money to do this.

We are lucky to have such a flexible ECU system that compensates for the extra boost
 
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ohc_turbo

Guest
#16
there would be nothing stopping you putting the head onto the ma12 but you have to take into account that its a high compression engine, you would also have to tap in a oil feed and return to the block, possible a figaro sump pan would do the return, you would have to look on where they have tapped the oil return into and carefully drill a hole in there and put a boss in etc. a lot of hassle to be honest and you couldnt run high boost on it, best to get a figaro lump and just put it straight in.
 
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JamieGti

Guest
#17
ohc_turbo said:
Best to get a figaro lump and just put it straight in.
I doubt that's going to happen as they are sooo rare! You'd be better just keeping the figaro! Well imo...
Where is this guy that asked for our advice, You and Ed probably scared him off with all this arguing!

-Jamie
 
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ohc_turbo

Guest
#18
there is about 20 on e-bay at the moment so there not rare at all, its the most imported nissan of them all, its a shame that the engine and loom and all ancillarys would cost about£1000, about the same a a SR20DET with absolutly everything, theres not much competition there if i wanted to spend a grand on a engine
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#19
I spoke to Dan for about an hour on the phone yesterday. He was actually very impressed with everyones speedy replies on the MSC.
 
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JamieGti

Guest
#20
Ed said:
I spoke to Dan for about an hour on the phone yesterday. He was actually very impressed with everyones speedy replies on the MSC.
Ok, I'm quite pleased then! I hope you gave him some decent advice?

-Jamie
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#21
30psi said:
Well that was an easy mistake to make. I haven't seen inches of mercury for some time. Easy to mix up with Kpa. Anyway I'm not here to compare different engines, but there are some incorrect facts about the ECU.
I clearly stated what pressure I was talking about, (millimetres of Mercury) you should check before you criticise. I use this value as most Nissans with boost sensors use this as their scale.

Firstly the ECU does not even think about air temps. Its not some sort of artificial intelligence advice. It purely runs off pre programmed data.
Its known indirectly by the fact that the MAF measures Moles of air passing through it. Some MAF sensors also include an airtemp sensor. Its a fact that directly or indirectly the ECU has to know the density of the air and the Figaro bases this all on the fact it does not have an intercooler, if you then add one, under some conditions you will get a much denser air charge for which there will not be enough fuel.

The water temp is a static adjustment, ie 20% enrichment over the whole range when at a particular temp and so on. It is actually set to have 0% adjustment at normal operating temps.
Water temp just so happens to be one of the largest correction factors on ECCS too, it also adjusts ignition timing.

There will be spare capacity in the ECU for fueling and its probably at a bar of boost. Naturally this doesn't mean the boost can just be wacked up, but to certain degrees it will compensate.
This is true, but there is a right way to do this and a wrong way. If it is checked after an increase with the right kind of gear then all may be well. But its not something I am going to recommend to someone.

Pre ignition is caused by the hot air temps, which the ECU doesn't know, and its best to have an intercooler.
Hot air temps is a contributory factor. Its not the cause. Its not pre-ignition either. The cause is cylinder temps and pressures above that which the fuel is stable. Det often happens AFTER the spark has been initiated, the flame front causes an increase in pressure that is too much for the fuel to remain stable and then the remaining un-burnt fuel in front of the flame front explodes, before the flame has propergated to it. This is why retarding the ignition will reduce this, as it lowers the combustion pressures to a point where the fuel is stable, getting cooler air in will also definitely help.

Not all the ECCS systems have a fuel cut. Only systems like the S13 and upwards have this.
I can guarantee you that the fig does, as does the March ST. I have several ST ecus from the basic road to rally ones, and a pile of daughter boards from other various Nissan ecus.

You don't have to spend £1000 to get an increase of power. There are ways to introduce more fuel. The system could be run on larger injectors and quite likely could be mapped.
Right and the flexibility of mapping a standard ecu and then testing it and making alterations is not as straightforward as a piggyback nor as flexible, plus without ICE (in circuit emulation) cannot really achieve this in a real time basis.

I have an S12 which I've increased the power from 135bhp to 237bhp. This is from a few mods on a poor engine design along with a boost increase. Now this was at the maximum the injectors could supply. That is possible due to the available fuelling capacity.
The March ST is similar, stock injectors allow upto 160bhp but then they are at 100% and you will get no where near this on a stock ecu due to various reasons.

So in summary... A remap isn't essential for a boost increase. Its ideal for optimum results, but not everyone has the money to do this.
At no point did i say it was essential, but at any point turning up the boost and hoping for the best is the WRONG way to do things and as such is something I would never recommend.

We are lucky to have such a flexible ECU system that compensates for the extra boost
Very true, but really they just see it as extra airflow, since they don't have
 
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30psi

Guest
#22
Ed said:
Its known indirectly by the fact that the MAF measures Moles of air passing through it. Some MAF sensors also include an airtemp sensor. Its a fact that directly or indirectly the ECU has to know the density of the air and the Figaro bases this all on the fact it does not have an intercooler, if you then add one, under some conditions you will get a much denser air charge for which there will not be enough fuel.
I have no knowledge of Micra engines. I only bought one for a daily economy hack.

I actually can't be bothered to reply in great detail, to which seems an excessive reply, pulling silly points out. I could go on about the theoretical side of detonation etc etc, and refer to various articles by different authors but I as I said I can't be bothered.

As for the water temp, it will make adjustments but only outside of the designed operating temperature. Its almost worth ignoring, since most of us will wait till an engine is up to temp before exploring its potential. Temperature compensation mapping is very difficult, and is only done once or twice on an aftermarket setup. Not the many times like a manufacture can afford to. Dunno why this is being discussed. You oddly said earlier the ECU makes assumptions on air temp from this and other bits.

The person who mapped the engine back in the 80's would have made educated guesses at the require mapping of running slightly more boost. They probably even mapped it properly at higher boost for safetys sake. I would have done if I was the manufacturer.

I do feel though it is necessary to correct you regarding the AFM though.

All the Nissan AFM's I've seen have an air temp sensor. Its job isn't actually to measure the temp as such, but it compares the resistance value of the hot wire in the air flow to the one that measures the temp. This difference it recognises as the actual air flow.

The greater the difference of temp, the greater the voltage output. Now the air temp part is required, as simply it would overfuel on a cold day.

As for your statement regarding the denser cooler charge. I would rather have a denser cooler charge running slightly more lean, than a hotter less dense charge. Detonation is more likely without the intercooler even if it is less dense.

I never suggested someone simply turns the boost up. I sat mine on a dyno on a number of occasions to explore the depths of how far the injectors will go.

My error regarding the mmHg is a simple one. The S12 gauge actually measures in Kpa.
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#23
30psi said:
I do feel though it is necessary to correct you regarding the AFM though.

All the Nissan AFM's I've seen have an air temp sensor. Its job isn't actually to measure the temp as such, but it compares the resistance value of the hot wire in the air flow to the one that measures the temp. This difference it recognises as the actual air flow.
Constant back and forth is tiring however, again if your going to persistantly try and show me up again the above statment is wrong or over simplified.

It is much easier for me to quote from elsewhere for those interested rather than re-write it.

A hot wire mass airflow sensor determines the mass of air flowing into the engine’s air intake system.

This is achieved by heating a wire with an electric current that is suspended in the engine’s air stream.

The wire's electrical resistance increases with the wire’s temperature, which limits electrical current flowing through the circuit. When air flows past the wire, the wire cools decreasing its resistance, which in turn allows more current to flow through the circuit. As more current flows, the wire’s temperature increases until the resistance reaches equilibrium again. The amount of current required to maintain the wire’s electrical resistance is directly proportional to the mass of air flowing past the wire.
I should add that the more current needed to keep the wire at a constant temp is fed as a voltage to the output of the MAF and to the ECU. Its a correction voltage from a comparitor feedback within the MAF, and is what is used as the main engine load sensor. The above has nothing to do with air temp other than that if the air is at a higher temp its density will be less and as a result for a given volume of air less molecules of air will make contact with the hot wire, and the cooling effect wont be so great.

This is how the MAF can indirectly take account of the ambient air temp and density by measuring the air entering the engine directly.
 
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30psi

Guest
#24
So you are saying that if the air is hotter (ie summery day) then the voltage signal will be less?
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#25
Yes. It has to be.

Air temp is exactly proportionate to the amount of energy the air molecules contain. If the air is hotter the molecules are more spread appart (air expands when hot - which we all know) so less moleules of air for a given volume will hit the hot wire, resulting in a smaller output voltage. We have to of course be talking absolute degrees Kelvin, so we have a change of about 273°C K (0~°C) to about 313K (40~°C) in the UK. On days with a lower barometric pressure you will also see less voltage, up a mountain etc. MAF can compensate where as a airtemp/MAP sensor base system with out a baro sensor can not.
 
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30psi

Guest
#27
So what does the temperature compensation resistor wire do that also sits in the air flow meter?

Judging from what you are saying, you are suggesting that if I took a Nissan out into the desert it will run lean.

Thats why there is temperature compensation built into the afm. It will regularise the output voltage regardless of -40 or +40 C
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#28
Your missing the point.

You need to fuel for the correct amount of air molecules in the engine NOT air volume.

The MAF reads the exact amount of moles of air entering the engine then fuels for that.

For a hot day the volume may remain the same, but the moles or air will be less, so the required amount of fuel entering the engine will also be less.

Thats the beauty of the MAF sensor the fact it is able to compensate (if indirectly) for air temp and pressure, since really it ignores them both and only measures the amount of air molecules entering the engine.

I should also add this is the reason WHY you must have a temp sensor on a MAP based load ecu, since with the temp of the air and the pressure of it you can work out the density and fuel accordingly.

In a similar way with Alpha N mapping, you dont have a pressure sensor but just air temp alone you then going by the efficiency of the engine map against RPM and throttle position and airtemp being the correction factor.
 
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30psi

Guest
#29
I'm not missing the point.

You stated that the air flow meter will output a lesser voltage in hotter weather, but it doesn't. It compensates for this in measuring the air temperature, so the output voltage is regular.

Can you imagine how rich a car would run in winter compared to summer if all it did was show the effect of cooling down the hot wire?

The temperature doesn't necessarily mean less molecules of air will be entering the engine. Atmospheric pressure will be more of a decider for that.
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
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#30
Pressure does not really change that much, todays weather is a good example however:



I see some highs there of 1024milibars down to 968milibars (see the isobars for todays strong winds ;)), thats a differnce of 56 milibars or as a percentage a 5.8%.

If I grab the same but of temp:



I can see a difference of +40 to -25 deg, ok so thats unrealistic as the UK wont get that, normally(!!) however, going by 0-40 deg thats a difference of over 14%.

I would guess that you would personally notice a 40 deg cooler inlet temp more than you would notice a manifold pressure change of 0.056 bars!

So I can most definately say that temperature will have a large effect on intake density (if not why have an intercooler?) Its not just to stop det, as can be shown on the fig as it does not have one, is mainly to regain air density that is lost due to compression and heat introduced by the turbo.

This will be the last post from me for a few hours as I now have a job to go and do!
 
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30psi

Guest
#31
Ed

As impressed by the fantastic meteorology, its irrevelant.

You dont agree that the afm has temp compensation. Its DOES have. Thats my point...

I'm not doing to discuss the number of molecules thats different with different air temps.

I am saying that the hot wire will be cooled dramatically more in colder weather. In hot weather it won't cool it much at all.

If it doesn't have a reference to air temp in the afm, the ECU will think the engine is under seriously more load in winter than summer.

The afm has 2 hot wires, one in air flow which is cooled by air flow and a reference one that runs hotter sitting out of the way of the direct air flow. The difference in resistance then results in the output voltage.
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
Official MSC Trader
#32
Its totally relevent since your talking about cars being driven in the above conditions.

The air molecules has _EVERYTHING_ to do with how much fuel is needed. If you know exactly how much you have in an engine then everything else is irrelevent since you can fuel correctly for the given mass (not volume) of air.

There are not two heated wires there is a single heated wire and a single reference wire. The are both in the airstream.

Again, from another source (an automotive electronics one this time)

Air passes through the AFS body (MAF) into the engine, a small quantity of air is drawn into a bypass channel containing two wires a hot wire (sensing wire) and cold wire (compensating wire).

Air passes over these wires and its resistance therefor current flow changes, the AFS is able to determin the temperature of the incoming air (like i said eariler - it does it indirectly) The sensing wire is heated to 100 deg C above that of the compensating wire, and an output voltage proportionate to the applied to the heating wire is fed out to the ECU. This value is direcly related to the amount of air (by mass - not volume) that is entering the engine.
 
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30psi

Guest
#33
Ahh so now you are saying there is a reference wire that results in a regularised output. Phew...
 
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F

Figaro Flyer

Guest
#34
Hi all,
I didn't meant to start such a heavy debate but I agree with Jamie, I too am learning loads. Thanks jamie by the way for the advice regarding the rear drums
I did mean to thank everyone for their speedy responses yesterday but work got busy.
I did phone Ed for some advice, "Thanks Ed" and Thanks 30psi for the points you have raised.

Reading all the threads and speaking to Ed has helped me decide what I want from the Figaro. My wife is instant on me keeping tthe Auto box:doh: . Ed tells me that any minor improvement would lost though this.
I want to be able to use the car on longer journeys motorways etc. Forgive me ignorance but my understanding is that boosting the turbo, adding an intercooler and remapping would make it much faster but I wouldn't gain much top end is that right?
At the moment 70mph seem like I am thrashing it. I want to be able to cruise at 80+mph.
I think I should look for a CG13 with an auto box and build it up from there.
does that make sense or am I just being thick?
Thans again for all your messages.

Daniel
 

Ed

Fusion Motorsport
MSC Founder
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#35
Hi Dan, Its quite good fun and not that usual that we get such a healthy debate on the forums!

There should be no problem sitting faster than 70 on a motorway as it is. More power will of course help, however it wont change the gear ratios or make it sound any easier on the motorway above say 70mph.

You could try a CG13 with a CVT auto box. They are very nice autoboxes, but are not suitable to high power or any neglect, they can snap drive belts and burn out the magnetic clutches!
 
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JamieGti

Guest
#36
You're welcome Daniel.
I'm glad we could help. I know nothing of the layout of the figaro but I'm sure the cg13 auto wont fit on the mounts you have - from what I've heard anyway.
It seems people on this forum can make alot of stuff up!
Ed's right! The car will still sound like it's being thrashed untill you change the box no matter what you do with the power!
You'll have to go with a different box altogether!
Like I said, if you need any help or advice, we're all here to help!

-Jamie
 
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Figaro Flyer

Guest
#37
Major Breakthrough:D
She has relented on the auto box as long as the car looks the same:girly: (ish)

I'm off to ebay
 
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JamieGti

Guest
#38
That's good news! :)
Search for a manual and we'll get you a shopping list of new parts!
Ed?
 
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ohc_turbo

Guest
#39
its good reading this topic, ive quite enjoyed how hotwire airflow meter works, not that i didnt know, but not into so much detal that a search on the internet and weather forcasts had to come into it, reading it though the first afm 30psi post was right and the last one by ed back it up.

still to my first post turning the boost up even on a figaro with a auto gearbox will be ok to a extent as the ecu will compensate but do this properly, ed will tell you how to do it, but be carefull of the auto box, i do not know how much it can handle, get rid of it if you can. I had my old silvia set a 1 bar by SE Nissan without a intercooler and its still running to this day, i payed 5 years back over £100 for them to do it but later found out it cost £13.50 for the parts but it is a testament that you dont really need e-manage etc. to turn up the boost if its done properly
 

Ed

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#40
If the figaro has the same auto box as the auto march ST's it will be fine for a big increase, however I must admit I do not know which it has. Ultimately its a about controlling heat if you can do that there will be no probs.
 

bombz4

Ex. Club Member
Club Member
#41
wow i cant believe how far this post went! but i agree its good to have discussion! i also have learnt alot, of which i probably will never need to know but hey. With out sparking another ruption, it would be bossible to slap on an intercooler and up the boost!!!!! although either the ecu sensors would have to be played with or E-manage or similar remap. and when i said about the st although different capacity i was refering to the strength of the blocks and not the power of them, anyway thanks for the interesting read.
 

Ed

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MSC Founder
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#42
Not directly, as I said the ecu will be mapped assuming on a high load the intake temps will be pretty high, (surprisingly so infact) so this means you must pull back the ignition a bit. You may see gains simply fitting an intercooler but since intake temps may be as much as 50deg cooler (and 10deg= approx 3% power) you should be taking chances at least not to do a very close inspection of the AFR and ignition under loads.
Put it this way you would certaintly GAIN large amounts of power by fitting an intercooler then a re-map even at the same boost, compared to just intercooling it and hoping.
 
#43
Hi Daniel.

The figaro has standard 500mmHg of boost, which is 9.7~PSI of boost. Quite reasonable really. Now I know of people who have increased the stock boost to around 14 psi. (on the March Turbos - same engine as figaro) and have rallied with this in Australia, of all places! I have not done this myself, therefor cannot recommend this or guarantee any of this information.

Rear brakes are fine. I have a Micra with more than twice the power of the Fig, and rear brakes never suffer as there is so little weight over them, the front however may need attention, but dont expect the stock fig wheels to still fit. In all honesty you may just be best to make sure the entire breaking system is A1 (dont assume so) and then fit new disks and uprated pads.

As for engine you dont have any options for anything bigger, well you have the 1200cc but it makes 65bhp, you already have 10 more than that.

You could fit K10 lowering springs and the dampers are sure to be old too, both of those would make a decent difference to over all steadyness of the car. The problem is almost any increase in power will instantly be lost via the auto transmission.
Hi. I'm new here. It's hard to find any info about modifying Figaros in general! I've had a few tweaks done that help. I'm thinking of a new back box or exhaust. Maybe a few more tweaks. But, as I've just fitted some alloys with 195/45/15s, I want to get some lowering springs! Will any K10 compatible springs work? When I ask the dealers they say they're not suitable. But, I think they don't know about the Figaro, in fact! Any tips are much appreciated!
 

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Yes. That's what I thought. I think my Figaro is going down 35mm on some K10 lowering springs very soon! Then on to the back box! Thanks!
 
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