Spigot rings

Hi all! My wheels seem to be making a drumming noise when driving. Could this be due to the spigot rings not being the exact size? The wheels were balanced a week ago so I would think these may be ok. I have noticed that if you jack up the alloy wheels on the front so they are just touching the ground and spin the wheel there is a spot where the wheel will be free to spin and a spot that touches the floor?. Anyone else had this?
 
Doubt , I've been running without rings and a set of note wheels on another for abit no problem, speically is the hand tight all to center the wheel then tighten,
Tyres not flat spotted or cheap/old ?,
They have manufacturers dates on them ,
And if the wheels were wobbling youll notice when driving , flat spots can act like a imbalanced wheel,
Also cheap tyres can cause road noise, as a set I had 2 years back were like that

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Doubt , I've been running without rings and a set of note wheels on another for abit no problem, speically is the hand tight all to center the wheel then tighten,
Tyres not flat spotted or cheap/old ?,
They have manufacturers dates on them ,
And if the wheels were wobbling youll notice when driving , flat spots can act like a imbalanced wheel,
Also cheap tyres can cause road noise, as a set I had 2 years back were like that

Sent from my moto g(6) using Micra Sports Club mobile app
Thanks for your reply, the tyres o the front and back are firestone (age unknown but they feel soft/young) I will look for a date on them and check.
 
I've never heard the noise but I have had issues at certain motorway speeds with the steering wheel vibrating, I was told it was because my tyres had warped which sounds like it could be similar to whats happened with yours

There's steel bands around the tyres in the rubber, and they can rust and all sorts which makes your wheel a funny shape, which could possibly cause vibrations or the sound you describe

If you have some spare wheels try putting them on and see if it solves the issue?
 
the other thing I thought, a slapping or drumming sound could be caused by the dampeners on your suspension having broken. If the wheel is just bouncing around on the spring it will slap the road rather than doing what the suspension is supposed to do and keep the tyre firmly planted on the road.

This would not explain the tyre shape though
 
Thank you for your reply. These are alloy wheels I got recently just repainted them and had them balanced (because a few of the existing weights fell off) The steering doesn't seem to be affected at all whilst driving, it is just the noise of the drumming sound.
 
no it didn't drum before it is since I changed to alloys. I have jacked up the front end so both wheels are just about touching the floor and there is a high spot on each side.
 

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
You are aware of course that the correct size spigot rings not only guarantee a concentric fit of the wheel on the hub but ensure that the wheel bolts are securing the wheels in tension only. Any sideways movement of the wheel on the hub, no matter how small, such as can happen when hard cornering, exerts shear stresses on the bolts, which can cause failure......
 
Thank you for your reply, I am aware and I am lucky enough to have other vehicles available to use if I have to go anywhere but I should have the proper pigots Monday or Tuesday (hopefully) but I really miss the little car lol!
 
The spigot rings are more important than some think, they stop any movement on the left-right up-down plane, meaning the bolts are doing what they are designed to do, only force the wheel onto the hub/disc. Without the spigot, or right sized spigot, then there can be a shearing force on the bolts, limited by the friction of wheel to disc surface.
 
I agree the spigots have got to be right. When I bought the first spigots I asked for some or a k11 and they sent me k12 spigots which are slightly larger unfortunately.
 
While I did skip some replies here, I do not agree spigot rings are necessary. When the bolt is conical and you use a pattern when fastening those bolts, the bolts will make center the rim to the hub. The required fastening force, say 100 newtonmeters for a steel rim are higher then a plastic spigot ring can withstand.

if you really have a tire there that touches the ground and then not, it sounds more like altitude gain. The tire has the shape of an egg and not a circle. You could jack your car, start it and put it in second gear. everything that is off when turning (roundness of tyre, rim being straight or not) will be a problem.

Balancing only makes sure that the thing you can't see that is weight distribution is evened out. This means that if there is a small deviation in rim weight somewhere or more expected some deviation in the tyre, that on the opposite site some weight is added. Tyres that are not round will run bad even on the rear.
 

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
While I did skip some replies here, I do not agree spigot rings are necessary. When the bolt is conical and you use a pattern when fastening those bolts, the bolts will make center the rim to the hub. The required fastening force, say 100 newtonmeters for a steel rim are higher then a plastic spigot ring can withstand.

if you really have a tire there that touches the ground and then not, it sounds more like altitude gain. The tire has the shape of an egg and not a circle. You could jack your car, start it and put it in second gear. everything that is off when turning (roundness of tyre, rim being straight or not) will be a problem.

Balancing only makes sure that the thing you can't see that is weight distribution is evened out. This means that if there is a small deviation in rim weight somewhere or more expected some deviation in the tyre, that on the opposite site some weight is added. Tyres that are not round will run bad even on the rear.
Sorry you are totally wrong, the wheel needs to to be concentrically located on the hub with the absolute minimum of clearance between the hub and the wheel, especially if the wheel/tyre are out of balance, to stop shear forces being exerted on the wheel bolts...
 
Yes it can excert more stress on the stud but under most road use ect isn't going to fail,+ may add mine been running for 25k without spigots and with Chinese nuts ( they are fine and after 3 years of use and wear of been on /off and over torqed ect are still fine ) hand tighten then tighten, gets the wheel within line ect and never had a problem,

And unless your studs are damaged ect should fail under normal use ,

Yes they should be use really but without is ok within reason aswell ,

Will say wheel bolts as what the k12 seem to break easier then wheel studs as the k11 use

But back to the point, sounds like possible flat spot on the tyre , but are they noisy tyres ?, Aswell, know my k12 did make alot of road noise over the k11 , and my old Firestone's were fairly quiet but some newer tyres were pretty noisey

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John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
the old hubcentric/lugcentric debate, how much support does a plastic spigot ring give ?
If it fits correctly, with negligible play, and the wheel bolts/nuts are correctly tightened, it gives very good support. If it didn't it would appear squeezed out between the hub and wheel like toothpaste from a tube..... :rolleyes: If it is not deforming it is doing it's job and the wheel is staying concentric to the hub....
 
Calm Down

Hubcentric/lugcentric or is it eccentric big boys toys eye candy tittle-tattle tat that’s created a problem potential hazard where none existed before? :ROFLMAO:
 
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the old hubcentric/lugcentric debate, how much support does a plastic spigot ring give ?
In the plane of the wheel, then it will give a lot of support. Remember that the wheel bolts only force the wheel towards the hub.

For general use, it might not matter much, but I'd want it to be right so I'd have no concerns if the wheel fell off then it wasn't my doing.
 
Sorry you are totally wrong, the wheel needs to to be concentrically located on the hub with the absolute minimum of clearance between the hub and the wheel, especially if the wheel/tyre are out of balance, to stop shear forces being exerted on the wheel bolts...
If you say so, I will not argue. It is just so I happen to have rims with lost spigot rings and the bolts are conical. Having fresh balanced tyres and fastening in a 4 bolt pattern with 130 newtonmeters on alloys, my steering wheel doen't even blip on it. But on the other hand my teacher also told me I'm wrong and for customers I would still recommend the spigot rings but for me, I can't tell the difference.
 
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