Rear hub removal problems

Hi folks
I searched before posting but couldn't find what I really needed. This is about my partners 2006 K12 Sport with 140k miles on the clock! We've had a loud humming at speed and I thought the rear brakes might be the problem, so tried to investigate (No wheel play or grinding so discounted bearing.)

In short, i am trying to replace the rear shoes and the hub will not budge. Guessing that the shoes are adjusted out into a worn hub face. (Automatic adjuster actually working, surely not!)

Is there access from outside to wind the adjuster in?

The long version...
Wheel off, cap off, 30mm nut off, hub spins fine no noises but stuck firm when trying to remove. Then used a rubber mallet all round edge to try and free it up, no better. Tried to lever it off with a large flat bladed screwdriver, still not budging at all.
Last resort, removed circlip and tried to get whole thing off, still no good. Then had idea of bolting wheel back on to give me some purchase to pull - well you know how that went as I am now out of ideas and asking for help!

I hate it when someone's first post is a help me post! But I did use search and it's not what oil/filter/tyre or how many psi...

TIA
Nige
 
Is there access from outside to wind the adjuster in?

Yea I think if you look at the back of might be underneath there is a small hole where you are able to adjust.
Other than that you have to jack it up put chocks under wheels so it cannot roll back or forward.
Then let handbrake off and spin the drum while tapping with some force but obviously not a huge amount keep spinning and tapping eventually the drum will give and move.
In the video I have seen I think you have to use a small but heavy hammer. Not a rubber mallet though that might work.

Here is a link to hopefully what you are looking for.

If for any reason anyone else has a better method please do share with us.
(Linked video)

Edit :-
This is not a guide to how to for what you are hoping to achieve. But it may help to you get to the adjuster. And allow you to see if there is a problem properly as the adjustment hole will not provide any clear view.

P.S. Good luck with this
 
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John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
When you do get the drum off, if you haven't got access to a hydraulic press you are going to have a nightmare pushing out the old bearings and pushing in the new ones..............:(
Is there access from outside to wind the adjuster in?

Yea I think if you look at the back of might be underneath there is a small hole where you are able to adjust.
Other than that you have to jack it up put chocks under wheels so it cannot roll back or forward.
Then let handbrake off and spin the drum while tapping with some force but obviously not a huge amount keep spinning and tapping eventually the drum will give and move.
In the video I have seen I think you have to use a small but heavy hammer. Not a rubber mallet though that might work.

Here is a link to hopefully what you are looking for.

If for any reason anyone else has a better method please do share with us.
(Linked video)

Edit :-
This is not a guide to how to for what you are hoping to achieve. But it may help to you get to the adjuster. And allow you to see if there is a problem properly as the adjustment hole will not provide any clear view.

P.S. Good luck with this
Love the way that the hub bore and circlip groove were not cleaned out to remove the rust, which in it's self showed that the original bearing failed due to ingress of water, then didn't stop it happening again with the replacement bearing by not bothering to fit a new rear seal to the hub (especially as the old seal was probably completely buggered by the 'gentle' way the old bearing was removed...........:rolleyes:
 
When you do get the drum off, if you haven't got access to a hydraulic press you are going to have a nightmare pushing out the old bearings and pushing in the new ones..............:(
Could use a vice and a kit that removes bearings and replaces new ones. But a hydraulic press is the best method if you have space for one.
The first link I gave only meaning to watch how he removes the drum and is not a great guide to follow there after..
This one is what I would intend to follow when I have to replace mine. (possible solution to the nightmare)
A Haynes manual or other type of manual also would be most useful to you for bolt torques to match your model of vehicle?

 

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
Could use a vice and a kit that removes bearings and replaces new ones. But a hydraulic press is the best method if you have space for one.
The first link I gave only meaning to watch how he removes the drum and is not a great guide to follow there after..
This one is what I would intend to follow when I have to replace mine. (possible solution to the nightmare)
A Haynes manual or other type of manual also would be most useful to you for bolt torques to match your model of vehicle?

A much better explanation, though yet again no replacement of the rear lip seal or even cleaning the diameter it sits on, on the rear spindle and putting a smear of grease on it.....
 
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A much better explanation, though yet again no replacement of the rear seal or even cleaning the face it sits on, on the rear spindle and putting a smear of grease on it.....
I totally agree with you and find that many of the guides are lacking in one way or another. There is also something else they do not say to use a dust mask and don't seem to be using one or gloves that are both really (Very Important) for safety when working in these areas.
As for us starting out we would not notice that something was missing. When that part is not shown. Unless we can see that something is needed in that area.
My main interest in this second explanation is the removal tool although there is no mention of where to get one of them and I was at first searching for a press or even making my own that is also not a cheap or easy solution.
 

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
I totally agree with you and find that many of the guides are lacking in one way or another. There is also something else they do not say to use a dust mask and don't seem to be using one or gloves that are both really (Very Important) for safety when working in these areas.
As for us starting out we would not notice that something was missing. When that part is not shown. Unless we can see that something is needed in that area.
My main interest in this second explanation is the removal tool although there is no mention of where to get one of them and I was at first searching for a press or even making my own that is also not a cheap or easy solution.
Here you go, cheaper than making one....found THIS on eBay straight away....:cool:
 
My other requirements for this would be a large vice.
If I do find some spare metal suitable for project. I will try and make up a hydraulic press. From a bottle jack my only concern with that is its just 2 ton and I'm only guessing that would probably not have the pressure needed.

One like this that requires no welds.
Seems an awful lot or extensive range of tools are needed for this project.

 
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