Rear coil spring upper seat corroded

#1
Looks like my k11 won't pass its MOT this time because the rear spring seat is corroded. It was an MOT advisory last year. The photo below was taken just after the last MOT a year ago. Is it possible to buy a new seat and weld it in? Or, how hard would it be to make one like it? I've seen some lowered k11's with these springs removed. How can they pass the MOT?

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#2
Removed probable means the have coilovers on the backz, but if your shell is rusty, and the top of the shock is rusty this would be equally as dangerous
 
#3
Looks like my k11 won't pass its MOT this time because the rear spring seat is corroded. It was an MOT advisory last year. The photo below was taken just after the last MOT a year ago. Is it possible to buy a new seat and weld it in? Or, how hard would it be to make one like it? I've seen some lowered k11's with these springs removed. How can they pass the MOT?

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Whip out the spring and wire brush the area to see the extent. If it's not too bad treat it and underseal it.
 
#4
Just re read my post, want to make clear that slight rust is ok as long as its still structurally sound. Hope you didn't take it as bit of rust = no hope haha
 
#5
Thanks. I think the nearside one is excessively corroded, so a clean up wouldn't cut it. I've started making a new pair. I won't be able to replicate the part but I can get pretty close to it. I just hope the chasis is okay once I cut the old bit out.
 
#6
On closer examination, I would need to remove the rear axle to allow access to the upper spring mount. Plus it doesn't help being a short sighted welder and working on a main road where people are constantly tripping over my electrical cable even though it's bright orange. If I had a workshop I would attempt it, but not on a public road. It's a shame to scrap it with only 43k miles on the clock.
 
#7
On closer examination, I would need to remove the rear axle to allow access to the upper spring mount. Plus it doesn't help being a short sighted welder and working on a main road where people are constantly tripping over my electrical cable even though it's bright orange. If I had a workshop I would attempt it, but not on a public road. It's a shame to scrap it with only 43k miles on the clock.
Why remove the rear axle when you can just remove the damper and spring.
 
#8
Why remove the rear axle when you can just remove the damper and spring.
It would be much easier with the axle removed. I might try removing the spring and damper to see if I could seam weld a new mount in. Even if I could weld in a new mount, the MOT guy might fail it.
 
#9
I managed to weld in a new mount for the rear spring. The old one was totally rotten. The factory mount was spot welded onto the chassis. Luckily the cover (turret) on the side was still in good condition and I could plug weld the new piece onto it. I could only weld onto the chassis where I could access it (green lines in photo. Where I could not weld to the chassis is shown as red lines). I'm thinking about MOT rules for welding. The weld must be all around. So based on that rule, the repair would fail. In order to weld all around I would need to rip off the turret and to weld the other side I would need a tiny mig gun and a mirror as the space is so restricted. There is not a lot of pressure on this mount as the spring sits on the chassis. The mount just keeps the spring in place. I'm confident that the repair is strong.

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#10
Finally managed to weld all around the new mount. The cover was spot welded on, so I cut a door so that I could weld the mount and then welded the door shut.

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#11
Passed the MOT today with a few minor repairs needed - front strut bolts loose and track rod end bolt needing replaced. The cross member on the nearside has some bad corrosion but still passed the MOT. I think the cross member is not testable on the K11. I was relieved they passed all my welding as it was a bit blobby. I took the offside spring out and the upper mount is in good condition (relief).
 
#12
Great repair. Can you describe more abiut how you made the new mount please? What steel did yiu use and how many pieces to make it up?
Thanks
Mike
 
#13
Great repair. Can you describe more abiut how you made the new mount please? What steel did yiu use and how many pieces to make it up?
Thanks
Mike
Sorry, I have been off the forum for a while. I used mild steel varying from 2 to 2.5mm. It was made from 3 pieces. The bottom piece that looks circular, but has a square outer edge. And the middle piece was a piece of pipe cut to size. And the outer rim which was cut from a much larger piece of pipe and bent into shape. Then all the pieces were welded with an arc welder. Be sure the rubber seat for the spring will fit inside the new mount. Try to make it the exact size as the original. I made mine too large and trying to weld the back side onto the chasis was a nightmare as it was sticking out too much and I couldn't see where I was welding (had to use a mirror). I used a mig welding to weld the new mount in place. I guess you could make one from thinner metal. For the MOT, you have to weld all around the new mount where it meets the chasis, so you should remove the tin spring shroud. It is held on by some spot welds - use a spot weld drill to remove it.
 
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