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PollyMobiles Rebuild

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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
box of rare rings. invoiced £66.60 for the set of rings, £80 for freight, £8.47 UK import tax and £11 brokerage surcharge. total £166.07

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four sets of xc7150

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package labelled another part # ? they share the same part?

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set of rings inside the box

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top comp ring with golden brown finish and marked N150

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2nd compression ring. just noticed in the pic it has a mark N150(?) thats barely visible

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1st oil ring

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2nd oil ring

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expander

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took straight down to machinist.
they're very busy and cos these rings were uncertain to arrive, I'll have to wait next week for the engine to be processed

meanwhile I continue working on the sump oil control
 
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They do say good things come to those who wait and let's be fair you've been waiting a bloody long time for those rings
 

solarice

Ex. Club Member
Good to see they've arrived :) they could have shipped them in a smaller box though eh. haha.

You've probably looked but google only has one listing for that other code...they're classed as hi performance according to the pdf on jegpistons.com.
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
i googled the part code XC2815LG which took me to a spanish company JEG pistons

http://www.jegpistons.com.ar/aros-1.html

and there i found some pdf's with heaps of useful info

types of ring sets
http://www.jegpistons.com.ar/Catalogos/Aros/Aros para 4T-opt.pdf

details about the xc2815 spec
http://www.jegpistons.com.ar/Catalogos/NPR/Aros 70-80.pdf

details about piston rings and fitting
http://www.jegpistons.com.ar/Catalogos/NPR/Especificaciones.pdf

here's a collage of the details about my rings



so from the top,
the ringsets part number on NPR's database is XC2815LG

the rings seem to be made by Hi Performance

XC prob identifies the types and thicknesses of the ring set.

the top ring is 1mm thick alloy steel, Ferrox coated with a chrome face. The etched N150 is the oversize dimension code "Number" 1.50mm

2nd ring is 1.2mm thick cast iron, phosphate coated with a tapered scraper face. The same etched N150 is the oversize dimension code "Number" 1.50mm

oil ring is a 3-piece Nifflex-S type assembly consisting of a pair of chrome faced upper & lower rails on a stainless steel wire latch type expander spacer. the expander spacer has a spec of green paint which is the oversize code for 1.50mm

7150 = 71.50mm and 2815 = 2.815" bore dia hence they're the same product.
dunno what LG means.
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Good to see they've arrived :) they could have shipped them in a smaller box though eh. haha.

You've probably looked but google only has one listing for that other code...they're classed as hi performance according to the pdf on jegpistons.com.
least they were well cusioned.
yep u found that site before i came back from the pub just then :)
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
is there a cost effective way of reducing fuel sloshing on the stock fuel tank?

mckenzie suggested fuel cell foam but how d'ya prevent it from fouling the moving level float? also question it's longevity. hearing you have to replace it every few year and some bad stories of the cheaper foams breaking n clogging the entire system ehich is very bad for a turbo setup on track.

don't fancy buying an expensive seperate metal fuel cell or swirl tank.

prob won't happen, but a mad side-tracked idea would be to fit a fuel bladder in the stock tank.
to eliminate air gaps and starvation, the air pockets in the bladder would have to be purged out either via:
* seperate vacuum port at the top of the bladder where the air floats up to OR
* the fuel pump is positioned at the top of the bladder so always before startup it'll automatically purge the floating air pockets first before being left with the liquid fuel below)
and then the bladder would always keep the fuel liquid away from any air.
as the pump moves fuel out the tank, the bladder shrinks and always maintains a constant supply of airless fuel to the pump no matter what the conditions.

like when you drink a caprisun lol

just a mad thought as usual :p
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
i just read a Prius has a flexible fuel bladder with vapour purging system to mainly prevent fuel vapour loses which could also be beneficial in preventing starvations?

no idea how you can monitor the amount of fluid remaining in a flexiable bladder?
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
baffle riveted on and the edges sealed

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onced cured i could finally proper test if it works
 
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OP
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Ebay BBS wheels with R888 tyres

oh my god:eek:
i cannot believe it but I've been keeping an eye on some r888's for awhile now, recently spotted someone on ebay posting 8 x r888 195/50/15 with BBS alloys and with good tread. I thought, I guarantee something like that's def gonna shoot upto £800.

anyway i thought meh I'ma pop max of £400 just to see if its possible to grab a bargain and for sumthing like that it's worth a try.
click! and OMFG i won it all for £368 !!!!! :eek: what the hell !? that's like £46 per wheel & tyre.

its a 5hr drive down to central london tomorrow to collect em but I won these puppies :D

the alloys are most prob the wrong PCD & ET so will be buying a pair of white rota grids for £200, pay a garage like £50 to seperate all 8 alloys apart, fit 2 on the new rota's, sell the BBS's on ebay (prob worth £50 each = £400)

so that's £368 + £200 rota grids + £50 tyre swaps - £400 selling the BBS = £218 for 8 r888's = £28 each tyre:p
shweet.
big initial investment but'll work out in the long run. plenty sets of r888s to run on then lol
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
this morning set off 5hrs down to london, needed alot of mountain dew and was so tiring

got to the road, knocked on door 13, "is that Ian? um no there is no Ian here m8"

checked txt and doh! its door 14 :oops: embarrasing

went to #14. Ian was out at snetterton racing so his wife Debbie showed me over to the wheels in the back. looks alright, abit used but alright.
popped em all in car and drove another 5 long hrs home

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alot of wheels

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numbered them to keep track

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curious of the pcd & ET, I fit em on my hubs and amazingly the PCD lines up but the centre bore is too small

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measured the width & ET of the wheel to see if they'll fit.

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interestingly the r888 is alot squarer flat walled n narrower than the wider bulbous walled T1R and even though the bmw BBS alloy has 3mm less offset than the Rota's, the sides of the R888 are actually further away from the wings and struts due to being almost 10mm narrower on either side.

i think what this means is i could simply get a machinist to lathe the centre bore to fit the micra hub (hoping they won't have to remove the tyre to fit on the lathe cos that could add fitting cost) and I'll be able to slap these wheels straight onto my car no probs :eek::D

don't care much bout the odd matched wheels on trackdays (maybe if I'm bother i could spray em white) but this could mean i don't have to buy any extra Rotas nor pay a garage to seperate and swap tyres around which'll save a huge amount for now nor will i have to store the BBS alloys seperately n try sell em:D

once the rubbers for each wheels are bald, then I'll just sell em on ebay mainly for the alloys and not bother removing the tyres

lets see the condition of the tyres I have then..

Tyre 1 tread
0.5mm inner
3.75mm mid
3.25mm outer
usable

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Tyre 2 tread
1.25mm inner
1.75mm mid
1.0mm outer
its at minimum tread

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Tyre 3 tread
1.0mm inner
1.25mm mid
2.0mm outer
at minimum tread

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Tyre 4 tread
0mm inner
3.0mm mid
3.0mm outer
usable

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Tyre 5 tread
1.0mm inner
3.75mm mid
3.25mm outer
usable

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OP
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
The damaged tyre that Ian mentioned got caught on his coilovers. definately binned

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Tyre 6 tread
1.0mm inner
2.5mm mid
3.0mm outer
usable

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Tyre 7 tread
1.75mm inner
2.25mm mid
2.25mm outer
usable

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there's some serious negative camber issues with Ians setup.
5 out of 8 have decent life left
1 is wrecked
2 are at min depth, although i heard ppl actually shave the treads shorter anyway for less movement, heating, shredding tread blocks off (like what happened to my front left T1R) and better preformance?

and some say you could run em down to the canvas to get ur moneys worth cos the compounds pretty consistant throughout?
once the treads gone they are essentially slicks:p

I'm thinking the plan is to run them till they're bald (or canvas if i dare) only on hot dry tracks, the 2 worn ones first then the other decent ones. then once used up i sell em on ebay

...ah just noticed the 2 worn ones i plan to use first are both LH. meh I could run one of em in reverse couldn't I since they'll only be used on a dry track and the tread for clearing water is irrelevent eh?
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
with the oil baffle welded and sealed I sprayed wd40 all inside the sump before and after filling with water to prevent it rusting

cellotaped the pickup hole to seal it and see inside

filled with 3L water and this is what happened


it works brilliantly :cool:

the chamber always remained filled looking at the lack of air pockets.
when turning, the loaded trapdoor shuts and does a good job keeping the oil in the chamber full initially while the remaining oil gathers at the far side of the sump.

now if i turn continuously such as a very long corner at such a high-G simulated by tilting it bout 45-40deg, the oil will seep but very slowly through gaps in the doors and top of the baffle as well as being sucked out the pickup (as you see the water level inside trickle down, I'm guessing there's 8secs worth till the pickup begins to starve and looking at recent trackdays the longest sustained high speed corner is about that long, the 180deg last corner at teesside autodrome)

during normal directional changes in track turning one way for few secs before turning the other way, the oil thats gathered at one side of the sump begins to travel the other way but is shuved straight into the chamber through the trapdoor thats now unloaded and this instantly brims the chamber ready to withstand another 8secs of high-G's in that direction

coupled with the new windage tray I'll make, this oil control sure looks like its gonna work nicely:)
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
the BBS & R888 weighs 15.1kg
Rota Grids & T1R is 13.8kg
my old 13" nissan alloys & yoko s-drive is 14.2kg
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
had a chat with me cousin and pointed out to check me pulsar caliper clearances, forgot to check that.
if its too close i could fit a spacer, could push the wheel out by upto 6mm before it begins to foul the arch due to the narrower r888 but 5mm spacer is the safest max, and fit longer studs.
just measured it and there's tons of clearance between the pulsars and the BBS alloys so its fine.

also seems I'll be looking at fitting a remote oil filter & cooler kit with pressure & temp gauges.
it can only help improve cooling more on track especially with a turbo on long runs.
think mocal does an entire kit?
the sandwich plate already has the threads for the oil sensors which makes it all convenient.
prob won't need an oil thermostat option since the car's always in a garage and usually takes 5min down the road to fully warm up, less to go wrong/seize and cheaper.

...just checked pics of my engine bay and there's absolute no convenient place for a remote oil filter. it'd be a nice luxery feature but i think I'll stick to the normal oil filter behind the block.
 

solarice

Ex. Club Member
you'd probs have to put it somewhere like wheel arch (depending on size) or something :)

I think the only issue you could have with running a non waxstat version is in winter, as the oil will be getting chilled way down...no idea how much of an effect it would have mind.

When i last looked there wasnt that much difference between the two, that was awhile ago now though.
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Few extra holes in the bulkhead you can relocate it to the passenger footwell :p
lol they won't be pleased and their feet'll prob keep kicking off the filter.
footwell's also much lower than the engine so if i changed the filter, oil will be draining from the head down the tubes and straight out onto the footwell making a right mess:p

i think a relocated oil filter has to be above the engine head and doesn't appear to be any room. tis not worth the installation hassle and i don't mind the normal oil filter position
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
you'd probs have to put it somewhere like wheel arch (depending on size) or something :)

I think the only issue you could have with running a non waxstat version is in winter, as the oil will be getting chilled way down...no idea how much of an effect it would have mind.

When i last looked there wasnt that much difference between the two, that was awhile ago now though.
wheel arch'll require cutting? naa I'll leave the oil filter behind the block.

in winter the cars in a garage overnight so won't be frozen at startup.
when the engine's cold the water thermostat just remains closed and allows the block to heat the coolant up till its 82C and opens up to stablise.
if the oil cooler is preventing the engine from heating up due to the freezing air passing through the oil cooler, it will block the cooler. or if the cooler is still overcooling the oil via thermal radiation i could disconnect and blank off the sandwich plate or fit a manual valve?

although being a turbo producing more heat than usual, maybe that'll be enough to keep the oil warm during normal driving in winter with a blocked off oil cooler?
 

baguete

Site Supporter
Nice job, as always. ;) Hope that all goes fine with the new engine.:)

I will install an oil cooler relocation kit too, my engine gets very very hot. I have a 76ºC thermostat, 26mm thick Swift GTI radiator and another temp switch to turn the fan on at 92ºC. But my turbo doesn't have water cooling, just have the oil feed, maybe the oil gets hotter because of that... o_O

BTW, do you have the template of the sump baffle? I could use something like that on my turbo engine... On the last trackday at a kart track, i had problems with fuel starvation on a 180º right bend, had more than 1/4 on the fuel gauge but on the track it was on the red. If we can get fuel starvation, we can surely get oil starvation...
 

frank

Club Member
But my turbo doesn't have water cooling, just have the oil feed, maybe the oil gets hotter because of that... o_O.
mine has water cooling armando, but i want to avoid using it if i can, you are basically watercooling the exhaust mani imo (and dumping all that heat into the rad :confused:)
the sump is a very efficient oil cooler, maybe add some fins paul :)
 

solarice

Ex. Club Member
wheel arch'll require cutting? naa I'll leave the oil filter behind the block.
Nah no cutting (as such) was thinking like where they mount the smaller IC on certain cars (like where the washer bottle sits on the micra)...you'd still have to find a way to run all the pipes though and they dont like being told where to go (based on my experience haha).

if the oil cooler is preventing the engine from heating up due to the freezing air passing through the oil cooler, it will block the cooler. or if the cooler is still overcooling the oil via thermal radiation i could disconnect and blank off the sandwich plate or fit a manual valve?

although being a turbo producing more heat than usual, maybe that'll be enough to keep the oil warm during normal driving in winter with a blocked off oil cooler?
Thats pretty much what the waxstat version does, it bypasses the oil cooler until the oil reaches the temp then opens up the lines accordingly. I think you'd need a different sandwich plate to fit a cooler, as yours is just for the filter (unless theres an adapter)...so you could either run an integrated unit (sandwich plate and waxstat) or just a normal sandwich plate plus the waxstat fit inbetween the oil lines.

Quite a bit of hassle / expense if you dont really end up needing it. :)
 

baguete

Site Supporter
mine has water cooling armando, but i want to avoid using it if i can, you are basically watercooling the exhaust mani imo (and dumping all that heat into the rad :confused:)
the sump is a very efficient oil cooler, maybe add some fins paul :)
My engine heats up the water very quickly anyway (stock rad or Swift rad, its the same), and the oil gets very hot too (when you turn the engine off you can hear the oil dripping.

About the sump, a week ago i thought of wrapping the exhaust pipe below the sump in heat wrap, there is so much heat there going to the sump. :eek: Adding some fins to the sump is a good idea, but a bit hard to do it efficiently...
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Nice job, as always. ;) Hope that all goes fine with the new engine.:)

I will install an oil cooler relocation kit too, my engine gets very very hot. I have a 76ºC thermostat, 26mm thick Swift GTI radiator and another temp switch to turn the fan on at 92ºC. But my turbo doesn't have water cooling, just have the oil feed, maybe the oil gets hotter because of that... o_O

BTW, do you have the template of the sump baffle? I could use something like that on my turbo engine... On the last trackday at a kart track, i had problems with fuel starvation on a 180º right bend, had more than 1/4 on the fuel gauge but on the track it was on the red. If we can get fuel starvation, we can surely get oil starvation...
with the 25mm k11 auto radiator, normal thermostat and long sparco IC, mine runs a normal 82C cruising on road and peaks 88C on a hot track. its when stationary where things get warmer and the coolant temps seems to be under control where fan goes at 92C and the temps drop down like norm.

my turbo can be water cooled but its not essential long as you remember to cruise 5mins and idle 30secs before turning off. not worth the hassle of plumbing into the cooling system too tbh.

yes i have CAD models and cardboard templates for all the pieces but bare in mind its for rough template use only and will not guarantee it'll fit.
alot is dependant on the craftmanship and detailing to pain stakingly file n fine tuning the fit, as with any custom made stuff like this

yeah the stock fuel tank and gauge system certainly isn't ideal for circuit tracks.
fuel gauge-wise: most of the time the fuel will be sloshed to one side whilst cornering, especially when the tanks level reading at rest in the flat pits is below 1/2, leaving the float level low down there and with the very slow dampened response of the fuel gauge needle it's not responsive enough. yes the float sender itself will generally give a realtime reading of what the fuel pickup is receiving but it's the dampened gauge that needs fixing, need to figure how to eliminate its viscous damping feature.

slosh-wise: the open void tank could certainly help from some sort of baffling although I haven't had a prob with fuel starvation on long corners cos i only ran till the needle was 1/4 'on track with the g-forces', which reads higher once resting on a flat pitlane.

there's a little pickup collective tray but it can only do so much

if I could mod the tank I'd do the same trapdoor treatment as the new oil baffle
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
mine has water cooling armando, but i want to avoid using it if i can, you are basically watercooling the exhaust mani imo (and dumping all that heat into the rad :confused:)
the sump is a very efficient oil cooler, maybe add some fins paul :)
aye when watercooling the turbo it's essentially become a direct oil to water cooler for the turbo & engine? the rad won't be happy with that extra heat.
a seperate oil or sump cooler will be better.

ah add fins on the sump, could've done that if I'd realised before painting it, doh
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Nah no cutting (as such) was thinking like where they mount the smaller IC on certain cars (like where the washer bottle sits on the micra)...you'd still have to find a way to run all the pipes though and they dont like being told where to go (based on my experience haha).



Thats pretty much what the waxstat version does, it bypasses the oil cooler until the oil reaches the temp then opens up the lines accordingly. I think you'd need a different sandwich plate to fit a cooler, as yours is just for the filter (unless theres an adapter)...so you could either run an integrated unit (sandwich plate and waxstat) or just a normal sandwich plate plus the waxstat fit inbetween the oil lines.

Quite a bit of hassle / expense if you dont really end up needing it. :)
with the solid IC piping, ABS, relay boxes, coolant tank on the LH, air filter, PAS on the RH, strutbar, carbon canister, oil catch, TB elbow, IC pipes and brake booster at the top rear I'm not sure a remote oil filters gonna work here.

the more £££ mocal plate has the waxstat built into the sandwich plate that (once warm) directs oil out one port to the cooler and the return port feeds back into the engine/filter. when cold, the stat closes and oil just flows through the filter into the engine like normal.

tbh the extra cost of the waxstat sandwich plate isn't worth it if covering the oil cooler in winter has the same effect and its just another thing to potentially go wrong towards making the oil cooler ineffective.
 
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pollyp

pollyp

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i just thought if I get the BBS wheels centre bore machined larger it'll prob require more labour to remove the tyres, machine em on lathe (£5 x 8), refit & rebalance wheels (£7.5 x 8) and end up costing prob £100? plus onced machined it'll prob make em harder to sell on cos it'll require spigot rings for the buyer.

so instead i think i should test fit the BBS in the micra hub till the edge of the alloy bore touches the hub centre (to centre & support the alloy on the hub so it doesn't sheer the studs off mid corner = bad), measure the hub-alloy gap required and buy some cheap 3-5mm spacers, a much more cost effective option.


some 3-5mm spacers are only £3 on ebay but they have massive hole gaps to make em universal, which i don't like cos the hot pulsar discs needs to transfer its heat to the alloys.
so i found a 4 set of Alu 4 x 100 pcd 5mm spacers for £15 and will be much better for heat transfer

http://www.wellspacedout.co.uk/aluminium-wheel-spacers-5mm/4x100-5mm-set-of-4
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
i fitted the hub to the BBS alloys with the hub centre touching the edge of the chamfered alloy bore.
the hub to alloy gap is 7.8mm so I'd need an 8mm spacer :/
this moves the tyre closer to the wheel arch lip when the suspension bottoms out and I'm not sure bout the extra stresses on the bearings on the track with such large offset.

the available spacers are either 2 x unversal spacer for £31 but not much metal for transferring brake heat
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/WHEEL-SPA...=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item3cc8267047




or a pair of solid Alu spacers for um, £54
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/HUBCENTRI...r_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item25725acdf0



the standard wheel studs are 46mm long and the alloy wheel nut has 30mm of available thread.
I measured the nuts are using 21.2mm of the thread on the Rotas and only 13mm of thread on the BBS with spacers. With such a high stress sticky tyre and pushing the wheel 8mm further out from the hub, it doesn't sound very safe



the stud would have to be extended by 8mm so that using the BBS on track the wheel nuts will screw in by 21mm, same as the rotas now, and when i swap back to the rotas going home the nuts will screw in almost fully at 29.2mm



these 16 x extended 63mm studs are £38
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Nissan-Mi...Wheels_tyres_Trim_Nuts_ET&hash=item2ebf9a6928



so the options here are:
1- to fit the sticky BBS wheels on with extra £31-54 spacers and £38 longer studs = £69-92 on top of the £368 i paid for the wheels = £460.
This would retain the wheels resale value of potentially £50 per wheel = £400 so I'd have only spent £60 overall in the end to use 7 r888's
But it'd be slightly compromising safety/reliability of the wheel bearings and fouling the wheel arch (could be fixed by adjusting bumpstop)

2- to get the BBS wheel bore proper machined for est £50 & labour of remove/fit/balance tyres for £60 = £110 on top of £368 for the wheels = £478.
The enlarged bore might affect its resale value down to maybe £40 per wheel? = £300 so I'd spent £178 overall in the end to use 7 r888's
This option is much safer and reliable

financially for just £178 overall to go get the wheels machined for safety sake, in the end it's pretty clear & logical decision cos in comparison I would've originally been spending say £184 on a pair of federal 595rsr and £200 on a pair of new rota's and £30 to fit em = £414

tis a no brainer:cool:
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
ohh another option:
#3- to buy pair of rotas for £200 that'll def fit and I intend to keep, get garage to remove the 7 toyos from the BBS alloys £40, fit 2 toyos on the new rotas £15, sell the 8 BBS wheels for £400, as i'm wearing down each pair of r888 get the garage to keep swapping to the next 3 pairs at £45.

so 200 alloys + 40 seperate wheels/tyres +15 fit pair of toyos +15 fit pair of toyos +15 fit pair of toyos +15 fit pair of toyos - 400 selling bbs alloys = £100 profit :D wahey an even better option
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
hang on, pricing error.
the value of a bbs wheel with tyre was £50 on ebay.
the value of the alloy on its own is only £20 so x8 = just £160 :/

micra hub is 58.9mm,
bmw bbs alloy is 57.1mm,
the rotas are 66.6mm with a 60.8mm spigot
so if i machined the BBS to 66.6mm bore the buyer would then need 8 x 57.1-66.6mm spigots that are £1.89 each = £15, which i subtract from the machined alloys value

so
option 1 = £300 spent
option 2 = £333 spent
option 3 = £140 spent

so the verdict is option 3 to seperate & sell the BBS alloys and fit the toyos on some new rotas
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
so here's a dilema
fact is when driving to/from trackdays on public roads i need 4 legal depth tyres. the T1Rs are the only suitable ones cos R888 are a no no.

if the original plan was to only use the 4 pairs of r888s on the fronts and at the rear use the t1r's till they're worn then fit the other pair of t1r's, when driving back home I'll end up least only have 1 pair of legal t1r's and 1 pair of illegal t1r's (or worst case fit 1 pair of illegal r888s) so won't work.

what i need to do is really keep 1 set of t1r's on the rotas ONLY for public roads and then have another set r888's for the track only.

which comes to option #4:
seperate all 7 r888's from the BBS rims £30, machine 4 of em to 66.6mm £20 (for my track use and to keep), sell the other 4 BBS £80, fit & balance the first set of r888's on the machined BBS £30, when they wear out fit the next set of r888's on the machined rims £30 = total £30 spent:eek: nice
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
No I suggested you bought your own tyre changing machine, but even second hand theyre expensive
yeah i can't imaging the cost of em and will only end up using it few times and i guarantee i don't have the space for one

...at least £800 for an old used one lmaoo_O out of the question then
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
these edge blocks at the front of the girdle will need grinding flat in order to bolt the edges of the windage tray to the sides

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a quick paper template

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scraper measurements look alright

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few tweaks at the edge i forgot bout

DSC06987.JPG


DSC06988.JPG


the outer edge of where the scraper meets the sump back wall seems very flimsy so i'll need to add a trailing stiffening lip all along the edge
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
may as well extended it fully down with few tack welds so now both front and rear tray sections are solid enclosed boxes seperating the crank from the sump

 
Great work Mr Paul!

WIth those tires won't they be ok for the strip once completely bald? Loadsa grip and AMD no worries with damage
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Thx will :)

Yea suppose they could, would prob have to really heat them up before theres any good traction.

Though shes setup more towards track than the strip but would be curious how it compares to last time with upgraded everythings, especially clutch
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Oh and especially without carrying a ton of tools & parts in the boot cos i had nowhere to store them last time. Would've really affected me times
 
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pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
just rang my machinist about boring the alloys and he quoted:
£40 to seperate all the tyres and fit/balance 4 tyres after machining,
£80-90 to bore 4 alloys (£22.50 per alloy)

recalculating the costs and it doesn't look good

option 1 (using wheel spacers then sell all the used wheels) = £300
but if I also sell the spacers afterwards = £250

option 2 (machine all the BBS alloys then sell them all) = £508

option 3 (swap tyres on new Rotas and sell the BBS alloys) = £448

option 4 (machine & keep 4 BBS alloys and sell other 4 normal BBS alloys) = £418

using wheel spacers and extended studs seems to be the easiest and cheapest option :confused:
 
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pollyp

pollyp

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