• Please only use these forums for blogs, they are not a discussion forum

PollyMobiles Rebuild

SuperUno

Buy & Sell Member
Not my work but makes sense... relating to our TB discussions:-

Bigger Throttle body nonsense…
I love my dyno, it’s great.
It doesn’t suffer from any placebo effects, it doesn’t read biased rubbish on the internet, it doesn’t try to sell you anything or try to convince itself that its most recent purchase was not a total waste of money and it doesn’t flatter with “suits you, Sir” lies; it just measures what is being produced and shows it, warts an’ all.
So, now that’s out of the way, let’s look a little bit at HOW engines breathe, since that’s what induction changes seemingly set out set out to improve…..
Suck, squeeze, bang, blow right? Yes of course, mostly.
However, imagine that a given engine has a cylinder capacity of say, 3000cc, so each revolution it would DISPLACE 1500cc (1.5 litres), and that it’s running at 6000 rpm; that’s 100 revs per second so 50 CYCLES per second and thus, 150 litres per second @ 100% Volumetric Efficiency (VE). Think about that, a hundred and fifty litres per SECOND.
Well, given how fast that is all happening the VE isn’t going to be anything like 100%, is it, because there’s so little time to fill and empty the cylinders, right?
All the little restrictions along the way; air filter, trunking, intake silencer, throttle body, plenum chamber, intake runners, ports in the cylinder head, past the valves (which are closed for more than half of the time) and that’s just to get TO the cylinder, after all that it’s still got to get out….
SO…. what would you realistically expect the VE to be in such circumstances? Well, if you were to put a huge vacuum cleaner sucking at an unrestricted rate of 150 l/s (saving the piston’s uppy-downy motions from doing the job) pulling air through to the cylinders you’d get, perhaps 75% of the potential unrestricted flow. In that case there’s 25% of the potential flow lost to the restrictions.
You’re never going to get ZERO restriction because there’s far too much other necessary stuff in the engine and engine bay to fit filter, trunking, manifold and ports of sufficient proportions to have zero restriction.
A modern engine is pretty good out of the box and you wouldn’t ever expect as much as a 5% improvement in flow without drastic changes, and those very same drastic changes would likely make things worse in other ways. So, best ways up you might see 78 or 79% of the potential flow.
How come then, a typical modern high-performance road car engine has a VE of as much as 120%? Yes, a 3 litre engine would breathe as much as 3600cc in two revolutions!
With its silly uppy-downy pistons, pulling air past valves that are only open for typically 36% of the time, through ports that often have rough surfaces and uneven profiles, through often convoluted trunking and in from the outside world through a filter that only has open areas of a few microns. It cannot possibly be, surely? That’s over 50% more than the possible flow when the valves are only open for 36% of the time and the piston is only on the induction stroke for half of a revolution. “Get the ducking stool ready people, something isn’t right…..”
Well it can and it does, using PRESSURE WAVES. Tuning pressure waves is what it’s all about. Camshafts, exhausts, intake systems SHOULD all work absolutely together to harness the highs and lows of the pressure waves to best effect; so effective in fact that it amounts to a very significant supercharging effect.
Flow plays a very low second fiddle to pressure waves when it comes to tuning, because the difference that a loss of wave amplitude makes is far greater than the potential flow ‘increase’ from having a larger diameter and guess what? When the diameter of a pipe increases, the amplitude of the waves within it reduce because the molecule compression occurs over a greater area (the surface area, if you will, of the pipe section), so while the static flow may be imagined to be greater, the dynamic flow is actually considerably less.
For example, just look at a GT or F3 airbox - the airbox is huge to harness the pressure waves but the inlet FLOW is through a tiny little inlet restrictor, and despite this the engines still make PLENTY of power.
A flat six engine (all sixes actually for a specific reason that we don’t need to entertain here) is particularly well suited to harnessing the pressure waves that travel back and forth into, as well as across, the manifold if allowed to. They can make a huge difference to the VE at some engine speeds. This is why the (not stupid) design engineers at Porsche have gone to such great lengths to make best use of the pressure waves by employing various flaps in the system to either block or allow passage of pressure waves within the system.
When developing their engines manufacturers will do many, many hours of simulation work. After that they will make many test pieces, probably at least twenty different head casting designs, fifty camshaft profiles, piston crown designs, valve head shapes, compression ratios, manifold designs, you name it. At each engine test, a zillion sensors and probes are mounted all over the engine measuring everything that can be measured.
DO YOU NOT THINK THAT AT SOME POINT IN ALL THAT IT WOULD HAVE BECOME APPARENT TO THEM THAT IT NEEDED A BIGGER THROTTLE BODY?
No, of course not, they’re all stupid those Germans, right?
It takes Fred in his shed with probably zero engine design expertise, to think “Gad Daim, I can fit me a bigger throddle on there an’ life will be reeeeeal gewd….”
If only things were that simple…..
In the vast majority of cases BIGGER THROTTLE INTAKES DON’T WORK so save your money.
In every single Porsche case that I have EVER had on the dyno, NO bigger intake has made an improvement, and almost ALL has made less area under the curve than stock.
When a vendor selling parts says “There’s a 25 bhp difference with this Big-Boy Carlos Fandango intake Sonny Jim” just consider whether he means UP or DOWN!!!!!!
 

Attachments

OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Not my work but makes sense... relating to our TB discussions:-

Bigger Throttle body nonsense…
I love my dyno, it’s great.
It doesn’t suffer from any placebo effects, it doesn’t read biased rubbish on the internet, it doesn’t try to sell you anything or try to convince itself that its most recent purchase was not a total waste of money and it doesn’t flatter with “suits you, Sir” lies; it just measures what is being produced and shows it, warts an’ all.
So, now that’s out of the way, let’s look a little bit at HOW engines breathe, since that’s what induction changes seemingly set out set out to improve…..
Suck, squeeze, bang, blow right? Yes of course, mostly.
However, imagine that a given engine has a cylinder capacity of say, 3000cc, so each revolution it would DISPLACE 1500cc (1.5 litres), and that it’s running at 6000 rpm; that’s 100 revs per second so 50 CYCLES per second and thus, 150 litres per second @ 100% Volumetric Efficiency (VE). Think about that, a hundred and fifty litres per SECOND.
Well, given how fast that is all happening the VE isn’t going to be anything like 100%, is it, because there’s so little time to fill and empty the cylinders, right?
All the little restrictions along the way; air filter, trunking, intake silencer, throttle body, plenum chamber, intake runners, ports in the cylinder head, past the valves (which are closed for more than half of the time) and that’s just to get TO the cylinder, after all that it’s still got to get out….
SO…. what would you realistically expect the VE to be in such circumstances? Well, if you were to put a huge vacuum cleaner sucking at an unrestricted rate of 150 l/s (saving the piston’s uppy-downy motions from doing the job) pulling air through to the cylinders you’d get, perhaps 75% of the potential unrestricted flow. In that case there’s 25% of the potential flow lost to the restrictions.
You’re never going to get ZERO restriction because there’s far too much other necessary stuff in the engine and engine bay to fit filter, trunking, manifold and ports of sufficient proportions to have zero restriction.
A modern engine is pretty good out of the box and you wouldn’t ever expect as much as a 5% improvement in flow without drastic changes, and those very same drastic changes would likely make things worse in other ways. So, best ways up you might see 78 or 79% of the potential flow.
How come then, a typical modern high-performance road car engine has a VE of as much as 120%? Yes, a 3 litre engine would breathe as much as 3600cc in two revolutions!
With its silly uppy-downy pistons, pulling air past valves that are only open for typically 36% of the time, through ports that often have rough surfaces and uneven profiles, through often convoluted trunking and in from the outside world through a filter that only has open areas of a few microns. It cannot possibly be, surely? That’s over 50% more than the possible flow when the valves are only open for 36% of the time and the piston is only on the induction stroke for half of a revolution. “Get the ducking stool ready people, something isn’t right…..”
Well it can and it does, using PRESSURE WAVES. Tuning pressure waves is what it’s all about. Camshafts, exhausts, intake systems SHOULD all work absolutely together to harness the highs and lows of the pressure waves to best effect; so effective in fact that it amounts to a very significant supercharging effect.
Flow plays a very low second fiddle to pressure waves when it comes to tuning, because the difference that a loss of wave amplitude makes is far greater than the potential flow ‘increase’ from having a larger diameter and guess what? When the diameter of a pipe increases, the amplitude of the waves within it reduce because the molecule compression occurs over a greater area (the surface area, if you will, of the pipe section), so while the static flow may be imagined to be greater, the dynamic flow is actually considerably less.
For example, just look at a GT or F3 airbox - the airbox is huge to harness the pressure waves but the inlet FLOW is through a tiny little inlet restrictor, and despite this the engines still make PLENTY of power.
A flat six engine (all sixes actually for a specific reason that we don’t need to entertain here) is particularly well suited to harnessing the pressure waves that travel back and forth into, as well as across, the manifold if allowed to. They can make a huge difference to the VE at some engine speeds. This is why the (not stupid) design engineers at Porsche have gone to such great lengths to make best use of the pressure waves by employing various flaps in the system to either block or allow passage of pressure waves within the system.
When developing their engines manufacturers will do many, many hours of simulation work. After that they will make many test pieces, probably at least twenty different head casting designs, fifty camshaft profiles, piston crown designs, valve head shapes, compression ratios, manifold designs, you name it. At each engine test, a zillion sensors and probes are mounted all over the engine measuring everything that can be measured.
DO YOU NOT THINK THAT AT SOME POINT IN ALL THAT IT WOULD HAVE BECOME APPARENT TO THEM THAT IT NEEDED A BIGGER THROTTLE BODY?
No, of course not, they’re all stupid those Germans, right?
It takes Fred in his shed with probably zero engine design expertise, to think “Gad Daim, I can fit me a bigger throddle on there an’ life will be reeeeeal gewd….”
If only things were that simple…..
In the vast majority of cases BIGGER THROTTLE INTAKES DON’T WORK so save your money.
In every single Porsche case that I have EVER had on the dyno, NO bigger intake has made an improvement, and almost ALL has made less area under the curve than stock.
When a vendor selling parts says “There’s a 25 bhp difference with this Big-Boy Carlos Fandango intake Sonny Jim” just consider whether he means UP or DOWN!!!!!!
very fascinating, thanks for sharing Matt :)
this applies to both NA and forced right?
 
I'd agree that I'd be very careful changing much on a performance orientated car such as a porsche, if I was looking to modify for increased performance (if I were looking for increased drivability then there might be things to tweak but I doubt it).
Sadly or not? that's not the case with the CG13DE or CG10DE the CG is supposed to stand for clean and green or so I've read!

So given the manufacturer is going to optimise towards a particular use or sets of use then they will make design choices to suit that use, they will also make design decisions to suit a particular price point.
So apart from the clean and green what was Nissan's motivations when developing the CG? Well the only vehicles it's in are small cheap motorised shopping trolleys, their primary purpose is a small, cheap, reliable, bare bones, runabout that is easy to drive, economical to run, so all the design decisions were made with this in mind.

On the other hand if tuning for performance this means there's some easy and cheap gains to be had, in my case a new exhaust and inlet manifold as well as a larger throttlebody (dubious benefit maybe) has given close to 33% more power (Nistune tune as well although a ECU would be tuned from factory to suit), if Nissan engineers were chasing performance then they didn't try very hard!

Look at the weight of the flywheel, the twin cats, tiny exhaust and restrictive cast manifold, small brakes, beam rear axle, spartan interior. Don't get me wrong I like micras but they weren't designed as performance cars, of all it's cars it's one where I'd guess Nissan was least concerned about performance.

Now if we look at Paul's application: Track day car, performance over comfort, heavy braking and acceleration, high cornering forces, turbo putting out 160 hp? vrs the factory 75hp, we are pretty far from the intended purpose Nissan had in mind.
Yes I know there were Nissan supported Micra rally cars and performance Micras that probably got factory backing but I'd argue the initial design didn't have any of those in mind.

The contrast between the CG and a VG30DETT (3ltr twin turbo z32) that I've been helping with lately is HUGE! the VG is complicated as, unreliable as, and goes like stink if you get it running, Nissan at the time weren't afraid of complications and going all out for performance. I'd change those motors for greater reliability, I doubt you'd easily get much more performance out of them without bypassing emissions or using technology they didn't have back then.
 

SuperUno

Buy & Sell Member
It was for interest reading, I didn't say it fully applied to Micras which as you say would have been tuned to a price more than performance. But given some of us have found little to no gains from using an increased TB size it is interesting reading. I suspect the reason for the standard TB being better for our application is that we are stuck with the standard inlet manifold (road rally regs and cost reasons) so the standard TB is 'tuned' to the standard inlet manifold. Moving away from the standard inlet manifold may see more gains.
 

frank

Club Member
you have to address the bottleneck first, the most restrictive area, and then when that is opened up you can probably fit a bigger t/b.
calculate the cross sectional area, for instance the inlet throats in the head are 18mm dia iirc, so pi x r x r multiplied by 8 throats that are each open for about 200 deg (depending on what cams you are running)
it they = less than the t/b then no gains
 

Low Rider

Poindexter
Moderator
Club Member
The elephant in the room here is that, it's already been proven (on an N/A CGA3DE at least) that increasing the standard throttle body from 45mm to 48mm does yield an increase, even on a bog stock intake, engine and cam. All testing done by one person on the same dyno. Anything more however resulted in a loss. Granted it's perhaps small gains when compared to those seen on a well proportioned manifold with ITBs for example, but it's a gain none the less.

Likely very true on a high end performance car that's enjoyed decades of progressive development with large budgets. In Paul's case however, if he's pulling a leaner AFR at WOT at any given point, the charge air density has increased. There's really nothing more to discuss.
 

SuperUno

Buy & Sell Member
Thinking aloud here, could running a smaller dia. TB shift the torque charateristics? i.e. shift it down the rev range?
 
That's what this (in results text):
http://www.hipermath.com/math_center/racing_calculations
Throttle body size calculator reckoned when I was playing with some numbers.

Curiously it's 'race' numbers correspond with the standard TB size it's not until you move the peak power figure to 7500rpm you get 48mm. 8300rpm before it deems a 50mm throttle body necessary.

It was for interest reading, I didn't say it fully applied to Micras
Sorry I can tend to make the point forcefully.
 
Useful calcs there. Anyone want to buy a GA15 TB????
I'm thinking of next time I get Spot tuned of quickly putting on the standard TB to see what difference it makes, trouble is that engine is going to be better able to make use of the GA15 TB. I remember the tuner being unconvinced about putting the GA15 TB on, Matt Argent has also gone back to a smaller TB as he said they were getting max air readings before the throttle was fully open so the smaller TB gives better throttle control.
 

Low Rider

Poindexter
Moderator
Club Member
Maybe it's worthy of it's own thread. I'll certainly be putting my experiences in my blog as I'm honing in on 250bhp from the stock inlet manifold and head :geek:
 

MicraPRO

Part Of The Furniture
Nice 6 hour catch up reading all this and well I tip my hat 🎩😎 pleased to see she's still going Paul, hope you're well.
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
I'd agree that I'd be very careful changing much on a performance orientated car such as a porsche, if I was looking to modify for increased performance (if I were looking for increased drivability then there might be things to tweak but I doubt it).
Sadly or not? that's not the case with the CG13DE or CG10DE the CG is supposed to stand for clean and green or so I've read!

So given the manufacturer is going to optimise towards a particular use or sets of use then they will make design choices to suit that use, they will also make design decisions to suit a particular price point.
So apart from the clean and green what was Nissan's motivations when developing the CG? Well the only vehicles it's in are small cheap motorised shopping trolleys, their primary purpose is a small, cheap, reliable, bare bones, runabout that is easy to drive, economical to run, so all the design decisions were made with this in mind.

On the other hand if tuning for performance this means there's some easy and cheap gains to be had, in my case a new exhaust and inlet manifold as well as a larger throttlebody (dubious benefit maybe) has given close to 33% more power (Nistune tune as well although a ECU would be tuned from factory to suit), if Nissan engineers were chasing performance then they didn't try very hard!

Look at the weight of the flywheel, the twin cats, tiny exhaust and restrictive cast manifold, small brakes, beam rear axle, spartan interior. Don't get me wrong I like micras but they weren't designed as performance cars, of all it's cars it's one where I'd guess Nissan was least concerned about performance.

Now if we look at Paul's application: Track day car, performance over comfort, heavy braking and acceleration, high cornering forces, turbo putting out 160 hp? vrs the factory 75hp, we are pretty far from the intended purpose Nissan had in mind.
Yes I know there were Nissan supported Micra rally cars and performance Micras that probably got factory backing but I'd argue the initial design didn't have any of those in mind.

The contrast between the CG and a VG30DETT (3ltr twin turbo z32) that I've been helping with lately is HUGE! the VG is complicated as, unreliable as, and goes like stink if you get it running, Nissan at the time weren't afraid of complications and going all out for performance. I'd change those motors for greater reliability, I doubt you'd easily get much more performance out of them without bypassing emissions or using technology they didn't have back then.
indeed my application is very far from the micra's original factory criteria but like any project car, kasandra is an ongoing experiment, making choices which suit my circumstances and letting me express my engineering curiosity to improve things :cool:
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
It was for interest reading, I didn't say it fully applied to Micras which as you say would have been tuned to a price more than performance. But given some of us have found little to no gains from using an increased TB size it is interesting reading. I suspect the reason for the standard TB being better for our application is that we are stuck with the standard inlet manifold (road rally regs and cost reasons) so the standard TB is 'tuned' to the standard inlet manifold. Moving away from the standard inlet manifold may see more gains.
there's probably a big difference in level of gains between N/A & forced induction when enlarging a restrictive TB
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
you have to address the bottleneck first, the most restrictive area, and then when that is opened up you can probably fit a bigger t/b.
calculate the cross sectional area, for instance the inlet throats in the head are 18mm dia iirc, so pi x r x r multiplied by 8 throats that are each open for about 200 deg (depending on what cams you are running)
it they = less than the t/b then no gains
yeah a system is only as good/strong as the weakest bottleneck
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
The elephant in the room here is that, it's already been proven (on an N/A CGA3DE at least) that increasing the standard throttle body from 45mm to 48mm does yield an increase, even on a bog stock intake, engine and cam. All testing done by one person on the same dyno. Anything more however resulted in a loss. Granted it's perhaps small gains when compared to those seen on a well proportioned manifold with ITBs for example, but it's a gain none the less.

Likely very true on a high end performance car that's enjoyed decades of progressive development with large budgets. In Paul's case however, if he's pulling a leaner AFR at WOT at any given point, the charge air density has increased. There's really nothing more to discuss.
it's all a balancing & compromising act especially when the cams, C/R, timings etc etc are all fixed.

having something too small or too large for a certain operation will throw the rest of the system out of balance making it inefficient, losing performance.

yup it seems that opening the restrictive TB on my turbo setup improved volumetric efficiency allowing the boost to easily cram more air density into the engine at high loads. It leaned out at the high end cos the Nistune map has never been mapped with this increased air density.
therefore will require remapping to utilise the bigger opening.
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
How are things going Paul? No input on here, from you, for about a month now?
Paul puts a lot of updates on Facebook these days.
allo allo John & Dave. sorry for the month gap, I'm still alive here :p

just being busy with working all week, working on car on evenings, working on ppls cars on weekends, and not enough energy or time afterwards to write my usual detailed blog updates here :sleep:

don't worry, big updates about the past months coming soon
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
applied some epoxy putty around the turbo oil drain fitting to temporarily reduce the oil leak

micra (0).jpg


found some more rust under the door seals

micra (1).jpg
micra (2).jpg


the snow in Feb was a nice test of the LSD working well :cool:

micra (3).jpg


after running the new engine 1000miles, time to service it.
rebuilt LSD giving the magnetic plug plenty of debris

micra (4).jpg


filthy oil

micra (5).jpg


winter sun inbetween the sun visors were blinding me and didn't have any vinyl strip on hand, so improvised with a roll of ducktape :p:cool:

micra (6).jpg
micra (7).jpg
micra (8).jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Remote fuel cap

wanted to ditch the old sticky fuel cap cable release and make it electronic, so brought some solenoid actuators to experiment

IMAG1340.jpg
IMAG1341.jpg

turns out there's a lot of friction in the spring loaded fuel cap so the tiny linear electromagnet simply ain't powerful enough. I'd probably have to use a rack & pinion or central locking actuator.

for the moment I tried making a quick latch

IMAG1344.jpg
IMAG1345.jpg

soon made it into a cable operated latch

IMAG1346.jpg
IMAG1347.jpg
IMAG1348.jpg
IMAG1349.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Reinforced upper front strut brace

often thought the OMP strut brace was basically too floppy & weak and just for looks

IMAG1327.jpg


chopped it all apart to make a stronger brace

IMAG1328.jpg


this adjuster could soon be used in the panhard rod instead

IMAG1329.jpg


made a stronger mount to bolt onto

IMAG1363.jpg


soon found the PAS pressure sensor block was intruding

IMAG1370.jpg
IMAG1355.jpg


so I machined it down and tied it to one side for now

IMAG1379.jpg
IMAG1380.jpg
IMAG1381.jpg
IMAG1385.jpg


figuring out the best structure, a straight bar between the struts would be the stiffest but it's too close to the TB pipes and obstructs the brake reservoir

IMAG1386.jpg
IMAG1387.jpg


a better solution was to curve the brace to clear the TB & reservoir, keep the forces going throuh the centre of the strut mount and anchor it to the bulkhead to reduce any flexing

IMAG1394.jpg
IMAG1399.jpg
IMAG1401.jpg
IMAG1404.jpg
IMAG1406.jpg
IMAG1408.jpg
IMAG1410.jpg
IMAG1411.jpg
IMAG1412.jpg


a lick of red paint :cool: and it looks the business (y)

IMAG1420.jpg
IMAG1422.jpg
IMAG1423.jpg


found this Bisto chicken flavour cap was perfect size for covering the top mount :D

IMAG1428.jpg


testing it in the countryside bends and wow the steering is a lot more responsive now :)
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
reinstalled the bonnet LED lights

micra (11).jpg
micra (12).jpg


here's a look at the cross section of the old JE low compression forged pistons that blew up last year, it's perfectly strong enough

micra (13).jpg


realigned the wheels with 0.15deg toe out, found it really helped turn-in and reduce the 'floppy' feel of the soft Toyo sidewalls

micra (14).jpg


after dropping and smashing my old & slow HTX One X+ phone, I finally bit the bullet and invested in a new Huawei P20 Pro with Twilight cover, mainly for the powerful camera and WOW boy oh boy is this one hell of a camera :D:cool::love:

micra (15).jpg
micra (16).jpg
micra (17).jpg


'aperture mode' gives some amazing depth of field effect

micra (18).jpg

but the main thing that amazes me is the friggin Night mode that can capture really dark shots and balances all the exposures like HDR and just look at how awesome she looks :D:D

micra (19).jpg
micra (20).jpg
micra (21).jpg
micra (22).jpg
micra (23).jpg
micra (24).jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Machine new adjustable Dump Valve

wanted to make a fully adjustable dump valve to balance the spring rate against the inlet vacuum so it only opens when there's excess pressure.
modelled the first prototype

dump.jpg
dump (1).jpg
dump (2).jpg
dump (3).jpg


machined all the parts

dump (4).jpg
dump (5).jpg
dump (6).jpg


it's bigger than I thought lol. boost was still leaking and found the pressure was lifting the piston open

dump (7).jpg


redesigned with a better seal and keeping it aligned straight

dump (8).jpg
dump (9).jpg
dump (10).jpg
dump (11).jpg
dump (12).jpg
dump (13).jpg
dump (14).jpg


works a lot better now
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
trimmed some soy sauce labels to decorate my oil catch cans lol :LOL::coffee:

IMAG1455.jpg
IMAG1456.jpg
IMG_20190224_175034_003.jpg


after 1000miles the new engine filled the catch can almost full :oops:

IMAG1515.jpg
IMAG1516.jpg

capturing a ton more vapour than ever, probably due to the excess blowby from the intentionally loose ring end gaps

log.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
micra (27).jpg


after buying a new phone, I wondered if the old HTC could be used as an onboard HD camera? to repair the cracked screen I found it's cheaper to just buy another whole spare phone and swap the screens :D

micra (28).jpg


roughly test fitted it on a jig and although it was HD quality, the phone casing etc was too flimsy & floppy so it was shaky & useless and biggest flaw was it can only record upto 4gb and just stop recording or corrupt :rolleyes:

micra (29).jpg
micra (30).jpg


friend at the car meet sold me their old cheapo action camera and although it worked, somehow during the trackday it stopped working :cry: still figuring what broke

micra (31).jpg
micra (32).jpg
micra (33).jpg
micra (35).jpg


there's a massive boost leak so did a few tests and found the old intercooler was more pourous than swiss cheese :poop:

IMG_20190309_150139.jpg
IMG_20190309_153159.jpg



tried to block the leaking passages with sealant but didn't work and tbh it's all probably fatigued now

IMG_20190310_095351.jpg
IMG_20190309_215358.jpg


reassembled before the track day

IMG_20190310_003412.jpg
 
Top