• Please only use these forums for blogs, they are not a discussion forum

PollyMobiles Rebuild

OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
the old tie rods are really worn with a lot of play.
cut apart to re-use the rubber boot cos the bolt is seized on

IMAG0682.jpg


the new rose joint. slightly beefier than the old Dunlop joint

IMAG0684.jpg
IMAG0683.jpg


machined & chamfered an extension for the weld to penetrate

IMAG0685.jpg


welded and machined it down

IMAG0686.jpg
IMAG0687.jpg
IMAG0689.jpg


PAS steering rack complete

IMAG0691.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
removing all the PAS plumbing since I'll be rerouting the cooling lines over to the auto radiator

IMAG0692.jpg


getting abit carried away, I can now clean the years of oil stain & dirt off the engine bay

IMAG0693.jpg
IMAG0695.jpg


a lick of black paint to contrast the red / silver engine

IMAG0698.jpg


to eliminate any movement of the steering rack, I machined some solid bush mounts

IMAG0700.jpg
IMAG0701.jpg


the off-side bushing has a flat side so I cut the solid part in half and used the original rubber for the other half

IMAG0702.jpg
IMAG0703.jpg


cut the near-side bushing in half to fit over the rack followed by the clamp

IMAG0704.jpg
IMAG0705.jpg


new clean PAS rack securely mounted to the chassis :cool:

IMAG0709.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
so a few months ago I printed these replacement plastic mounts for a m8s glass sliding shower door

door.jpg
door (1).jpg


but the heavy weight of the glass had cracked the weak PLA plastic

door (2).jpg


so I redesigned it out of really beefy stainless steel to ensure it's strong enough this time :D

door (3).jpg
door (4).jpg
door (5).jpg


cutting some 8mm thick stainless bar for the bracket plates.
it's abit OTT but best to overengineer it :p

IMAG0715.jpg


machined the supporting collars that fits over the ball joint

IMAG0717.jpg


drilled the plates

IMAG0718.jpg


tapped

IMAG0721.jpg


machined the socket screw heads smaller so they don't foul. the two screws fit into the oval glass holes which keeps the bracket upright.

IMAG0722.jpg
IMAG0724.jpg


welded up

IMAG0755.jpg


and rounded the corners

IMAG0758.jpg
IMAG0760.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
New CG13DE engine

Several weeks ago I was messaged about a guy selling this complete CG13 engine with extras for £80 + £40 postage, probably done 100k, only owned by two prev victors so it's hardly ragged but he's down Suffolk.

other local offers where £150 but they're just for a bare engine or short block.

the guy needed time finding a pallet & sorting courier before I could buy it, and since I had other stuff in the engine bay to fix, I patiently waited.
he had a slight issue with the courier who won't collect the pallet without his signature and he couldn't have it collected from his new work place :(

but then he said he was driving up to Lincoln to visit his gf on weekend and it's only £40 of fuel in total for me to drive there/back, exactly the same as the courier.

so I drove 4hrs down to lincoln, brought the whole thing for £80, another tiring 4hrs back home and wahey I have a new engine along with tons of bonus extras :D:D

IMAG0725.jpg
IMAG0726.jpg
IMAG0727.jpg
IMAG0728.jpg
IMAG0729.jpg
IMAG0730.jpg


yup it's a cg13de

IMAG0732.jpg


begin stripping all the bits off

IMAG0733.jpg


checking 4 plugs, they're simply perfect. been running spot on

IMAG0734.jpg


removed inlet mani and even the gasket is still intact :D

IMAG0736.jpg


inlet is real clean

IMAG0737.jpg


here's the oil filter that's fitted, but wth? it's brand new, still fresh dry and never used before I brought this :eek::D saves me buying one :p

IMAG0738.jpg
IMAG0739.jpg


exhaust gasket is that nasty cheap graphite composite type

IMAG0740.jpg


nice lean dusting of soot

IMAG0741.jpg


fresh manifold with an O2 & cat

IMAG0742.jpg
IMAG0743.jpg


still clean & flat face compaired to mine

IMAG0744.jpg


here's a surprise, normally these philips screws on the rocker covers are often seized at this age but amazingly they all loosened off easily :D:D

IMAG0745.jpg


inside looks quite nice & normal with no sludge :cool: it looks hardly used

IMAG0746.jpg


water pump is also kinda recent but has this strange jelly deposit from the dried coolant?

IMAG0748.jpg


stacking up all the major bits & pieces in the garage, good to know I'll have plenty of spares to keep her going for many yrs :):D

IMAG0752.jpg


checking the valve clearances first and wow they're all spot on within spec.

Inlet 1 (0.305 / 0.279)
Inlet 2 (0.279 / 0.305)
Inlet 3 (0.279 / 0.305)
Inlet 4 (0.279 / 0.279)

Exh 1 (0.381 / 0.381)
Exh 2 (0.381 / 0.356)
Exh 3 (0.356 / 0.381)
Exh 4 (0.356 / 0.356)

IMAG0761.jpg


this is by far hands down thee best conditioned, easiest to work on and absolute bargain spare cg13 I've ever brought :love::cool:
 
Last edited:

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
so a few months ago I printed these replacement plastic mounts for a m8s glass sliding shower door

View attachment 60106View attachment 60101

but the heavy weight of the glass had cracked the weak PLA plastic

View attachment 60102

so I redesigned it out of really beefy stainless steel to ensure it's strong enough this time :D

View attachment 60103View attachment 60104View attachment 60105

cutting some 8mm thick stainless bar for the bracket plates.
it's abit OTT but best to overengineer it :p

View attachment 60107

machined the supporting collars that fits over the ball joint

View attachment 60108

drilled the plates

View attachment 60109

tapped

View attachment 60110

machined the socket screw heads smaller so they don't foul. the two screws fit into the oval glass holes which keeps the bracket upright.

View attachment 60111View attachment 60112

welded up

View attachment 60113

and rounded the corners

View attachment 60114View attachment 60115
I like the idea Paul but.........
You are now putting a LOT more weight onto the glass panel, which I assume hangs from the fairly flimsy frame/track. This will be the next failure point and not so easy to fix.........:oops:
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
I like the idea Paul but.........
You are now putting a LOT more weight onto the glass panel, which I assume hangs from the fairly flimsy frame/track. This will be the next failure point and not so easy to fix.........:oops:
relative to the weight of the glass which weighs a ton, these brackets are only at worst gonna add bout the weight of a jug of water overall :p
most of the door weight goes through the bottom rail which is anchored to the shower floor.
the top rail is just there to keep it upright.

tbh because this old shower unit is obviously no longer supported with any spares, this was just a 'last resort' fix for him to avoid shelling £££ for a whole new shower setup :p
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
removed the sump, oil abit black & old

IMAG0763.jpg


cams off, just a light film of baked oil

IMAG0767.jpg


measuring the shims

IMAG0770.jpg


amazing to find the head bolts are super clean & never touched since factory

IMAG0771.jpg


pistons & oem HG in good condition

IMAG0773.jpg


IMAG0774.jpg
IMAG0775.jpg
IMAG0776.jpg
IMAG0777.jpg


open-deck manual CG13 block

IMAG0786.jpg


but just look at the water jacket, they're still factory fresh with no rust and the cylinder top doesn't have any wear ridges.
been well maintained :cool:

IMAG0784.jpg


coolant softening the old HG as usual

IMAG0783.jpg


other than coolant staining, the head is fine & untouched.
one of the exhaust valve on cyl #2 is oddly lean?

IMAG0778.jpg


IMAG0779.jpg
IMAG0780.jpg
IMAG0781.jpg
IMAG0782.jpg
 
That engine looks like a great find :) good luck with the rebuild, glad to see things are moving in the right direction again for you.

Sent from my SM-G901F using Tapatalk
 

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
I thought that you were going to base the rebuild on another auto block Paul? How will the open deck block stand up to the high state of tune that you had before?
 

Low Rider

Poindexter
Moderator
Club Member
Are you forging this engine Paul or just stripping it down regardless?

I thought that you were going to base the rebuild on another auto block Paul? How will the open deck block stand up to the high state of tune that you had before?
An open deck block will be more than up to the task of ~160bhp :)
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
I thought that you were going to base the rebuild on another auto block Paul? How will the open deck block stand up to the high state of tune that you had before?
preferably an auto block but this is what I got and tbh the fresh condition of this whole engine is more important than trying to obtain a closed-deck structure.

I've ran a normal open-deck block with this turbo setup before and the HG was perfectly fine throughout daily & track abuse...till something cracked the #3 ring land one night (probably standard end gaps too tight?)
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Are you forging this engine Paul or just stripping it down regardless?



An open deck block will be more than up to the task of ~160bhp :)
can't afford forged bits.
just my usual way of stripping it all down to fully inspect / log the condition and then increase the end gaps so the chocolate pistons don't bind up again with the turbo at full wack
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
with both old & new engine stripped down, I can compare the subtle differences between the two blocks

IMAG0791.jpg


old destroyed automatic CG13 block (left)
Vs newer manual CG13 (right)

IMAG0802.jpg


first thing I noticed was that all of my previous blocks over the years auto or manual would have this lower-sprocket oiling jet but this new block doesn't have it at all? :unsure:

IMAG0789.jpg


IMAG0793.jpg


slightly different stamping between the two layouts & generation

IMAG0796.jpg


old block had 4 bolts for the crank breather shield whereas the new block just uses 3

IMAG0798.jpg


old block featuring an extra port in the main bearing for feeding oil onto the lower timing chain / sprocket.
and very subtle mould & number difference in the corner


IMAG0800.jpg
IMAG0803.jpg


wonder if these engine number stamps are numerically ascending?

IMAG0804.jpg


closed deck vs open deck

IMAG0806.jpg
IMAG0807.jpg
IMAG0808.jpg
 

Low Rider

Poindexter
Moderator
Club Member
I'll check my CGA3 that's up on the engine stand as a comparison, just for the fun of it. The only obvious difference on the later blocks is the inclusion of a mount point for a knock sensor.

I've noted that the numbers on the engine are fairly meaningless with respect to dates. On the later coilpack engines, there's actually a stamping on the cam side cover which has the year/month of manufacture on it. The last CGA3 donor engine I bought was a 2002 unit, so fairly late.
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
I'll check my CGA3 that's up on the engine stand as a comparison, just for the fun of it. The only obvious difference on the later blocks is the inclusion of a mount point for a knock sensor.

I've noted that the numbers on the engine are fairly meaningless with respect to dates. On the later coilpack engines, there's actually a stamping on the cam side cover which has the year/month of manufacture on it. The last CGA3 donor engine I bought was a 2002 unit, so fairly late.
cool, knock sensor would be handy for forced induction :cool:
aye the engine # at the front seems to just be serial #.

the stamping above the rear crank seal appears to be the block casting date.
here's a few I found from my collection.

DSC08054.JPG
IMAG0813.jpg
IMAG0814.jpg


I'm guessing:
'M' is manufactured,
left dial is Year,
right dial is Week of the year,
#2 is closed-deck automatic type block,
#9 is open-deck manual type block.
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
pistons #1 - 4 appear ok, slight carbon above the oil rings

IMAG0815.jpg
IMAG0817.jpg
IMAG0819.jpg
IMAG0821.jpg


big end & main shells look normal

IMAG0816.jpg
IMAG0818.jpg
IMAG0820.jpg
IMAG0822.jpg


cleaned all the old carbon off the pistons & grooves

IMAG0823.jpg


measuring the ring end gaps

IMAG0824.jpg


(Cylinder 1 / 2 / 3 / 4)
Top
(0.406 / 0.432 / 0.432 / 0.457)
2nd (0.457 / 0.457 / 0.559 / 0.508)

all the oil ring gaps were beyond my 1mm feeler gauges.

so while the rest of the engine is fresh & tight, the rings are oddly worn at the max oem limit for running N/A.
but since I was gonna widen the end gaps to ensure they don't bind up & crack ringlands from the intense heat of running turbo, it seems normal wear & tear has already done that for me so no need to touch it :D

cleaned the block & retapped threads

IMAG0825.jpg
IMAG0826.jpg
IMAG0827.jpg


assembled the pistons & crank. chose the thickest pair of thrust bearings from both engines and the end-float is now 0.127mm (right in middle of the limits)

IMAG0828.jpg
IMAG0829.jpg
IMAG0830.jpg


cleaned the sealing surfaces with razor blades

IMAG0832.jpg
IMAG0833.jpg


new HG

IMAG0835.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
old timing chain guide marked as week 66 (left) while the new guide marked as week 97 appears less worn (right)

IMAG0836.jpg
IMAG0837.jpg


the old lower tensioner (left) seems less worn than the newer tensioner (right) which has quite deep grooves

IMAG0839.jpg
IMAG0838.jpg


the old upper tensioner (left) is fresher than the new upper tensioner (right)

IMAG0840.jpg
IMAG0841.jpg


comparing old & new timing chains, they're both exactly the same length with zero stretch

IMAG0842.jpg


but noticed the new mid-idler pulley is a lighter design, cos racekor :D

IMAG0843.jpg
IMAG0844.jpg


also the idler pulley shaft features a narrow 'step' in the oil gallery before the oiling holes :unsure:

IMAG0845.jpg


fit timing cover

IMAG0847.jpg


fresh HG

IMAG0848.jpg


head bolts all torqued down perfectly :cool:

IMAG0849.jpg
 

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
Had you considered, Paul, that the difference in timing chain guide wear could well be due to the better lower sprocket lubrication on the old engine? Did you drill & tap the boss on the new block and fit the oil jet from the old engine?
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Had you considered, Paul, that the difference in timing chain guide wear could well be due to the better lower sprocket lubrication on the old engine? Did you drill & tap the boss on the new block and fit the oil jet from the old engine?
possibly, but all the chain guides, piston rings, cylinder pitting and crank thrust bearings are equally worn out so it could just be high mileage?
the minimal sludge suggests regular oil changes?

my pillar drill ain't big enough for the block to accurately drill the gallery holes for an oil jet. drilling it by hand won't be as accurate and very risky imo for little return.
I would've thought the timing chain was lubed enough from excess oil spraying from all the camshaft bearings/sprockets, idler sprocket, hydraulic tensioners & main bearing?
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
valve shim thicknesses corrected & cams fitted :cool:

IMAG0851.jpg
IMAG0852.jpg


now the rebuilt valve clearances are perfection :love:

Inlet 1 (0.279 / 0.279)
Inlet 2 (0.279 / 0.279)
Inlet 3 (0.279 / 0.279)
Inlet 4 (0.279 / 0.279)

Exh 1 (0.356 / 0.356)
Exh 2 (0.356 / 0.356)
Exh 3 (0.356 / 0.356)
Exh 4 (0.356 / 0.381)
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
To finish making these clamping washers for a friends shower door mount I cut, drilled & grinded these stacks of steel plates simultaneously to maintain accuracy

IMAG0854.jpg
IMAG0855.jpg


complete. just need to add some rubber cusions

IMAG0856.jpg
IMAG0857.jpg
IMAG0858.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
curved the face of the shower mount with a grinder to follow the curve of the glass door and apply clamping force only in the middle without bending/shattering the glass

IMAG0860.jpg


finished by sticking some foam on top to cusion the glass

IMAG0862.jpg
IMAG0864.jpg


at work the new delivery had missing or detached headlight tilting motors so the beams were simply pointing right down at night

IMAG0866.jpg


as a simple quick temporary fix to hold the reflector up, I made these adjustable pegs with some nuts, bolts & washers

IMAG0868.jpg


worked a treat and can see at night now :cool:

IMAG0869.jpg
IMAG0871.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
comparing the old & new rear crank seals before fitting.
the dark brown seal from my blown up engine (12279-BX00A / INA53538) was fitted back in 2013 and the sealing edge still appears sharp so I reused it.
the light brown seal from the spare engine (12279-2F000 - INA53384) looks original from the 90s and the seal lips have worn a bit flatter

IMAG0872.jpg
IMAG0873.jpg
IMAG0874.jpg
IMAG0875.jpg


some studs & this grub screw were seized on

IMAG0876.jpg


so I did the old trick of adding welds on the fastener to both heat up & provide more leverage

IMAG0877.jpg


1st attempt simply snapped off cos the surrounding Alu head was soaking all the heat away so the weld nugget couldn't fuse to the steel grub screw

IMAG0878.jpg


tried Max setting and the hotter weld worked :)

IMAG0879.jpg
IMAG0880.jpg


wirebrushed the engine clean :cool:

IMAG0881.jpg
IMAG0882.jpg
IMAG0883.jpg
IMAG0884.jpg
IMAG0885.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
I plan to replace all the ferrous steel pipes in the cooling system (which tends to rust & contaminate the fluid) with stainless/alloy so the coolant stays cleaner for longer.

clamped the thermostat housing steel pipes in a vice & twisted em off

IMAG0889.jpg


machined & inserted the new alloy ports

IMAG0892.jpg
IMAG0893.jpg
IMAG0896.jpg


testing the thermostats and the genuine one from the spare engine worked perfect so I'm reusing it, whereas the aftermarket stat from the blown engine no longer opens fully

IMAG0897.jpg
IMAG0900.jpg


fitted the stainless manifold studs

IMAG0902.jpg
IMAG0901.jpg
 

SuperUno

Buy & Sell Member
Do you think the partially opening thermostat caused you issues? We know number 3 is the weak spot, and my old rally engine the paint around no 3 flaked off with the heat but the other three were all ok. Is there an issue with the water flow around no 3?
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
Do you think the partially opening thermostat caused you issues? We know number 3 is the weak spot, and my old rally engine the paint around no 3 flaked off with the heat but the other three were all ok. Is there an issue with the water flow around no 3?
It's never ever overheated at all so I think it opens far enough for normal use but just not ideal for max cooling on track.

Sent from my HTC One X+ using Micra Sports Club mobile app
 
I plan to replace all the ferrous steel pipes in the cooling system (which tends to rust & contaminate the fluid) with stainless/alloy so the coolant stays cleaner for longer.

clamped the thermostat housing steel pipes in a vice & twisted em off

View attachment 60296

machined & inserted the new alloy ports

View attachment 60297View attachment 60298View attachment 60299

testing the thermostats and the genuine one from the spare engine worked perfect so I'm reusing it, whereas the aftermarket stat from the blown engine no longer opens fully

View attachment 60300View attachment 60301

fitted the stainless manifold studs

View attachment 60303View attachment 60302
Hello Master Paul first of all you are doing a great job as usual.
Those two pipes almost f..k my engine they was litterally gone and rusty.
Fortunately i saw some drops when i was changing The alternator belt.
The hoses was attacked to the house with a few millimiter
Ciao.


Inviato dal mio SM-J500FN utilizzando Tapatalk
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
I think I would have put a couple of shallow grooves in each pipe and used some Loctite
Studlock, then pushed them into the housing..............
it was quite a tight fit to press in, like the originals so I think it'll be alreet. pretty difficult to get em back out without wrecking it :p
 

John_D

Club Member
Radio Code Guru
it was quite a tight fit to press in, like the originals so I think it'll be alreet. pretty difficult to get em back out without wrecking it :p
The secret of getting a good interference fit without any loctite or similar would be to make the tube at least 5 thou bigger than the hole in the housing, then put the tube in the freezer for a couple of hours and heat the housing in boiling water, same principle used for shrink fitting the ring gear on a flywheel.......
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
The secret of getting a good interference fit without any loctite or similar would be to make the tube at least 5 thou bigger than the hole in the housing, then put the tube in the freezer for a couple of hours and heat the housing in boiling water, same principle used for shrink fitting the ring gear on a flywheel.......
gr8 tip john :)
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
I might be wrong but I'm fairly sure the steel pipes are cast into housing originally.
looking at the steel pipe from the inside it clearly looked like the housing was drilled straight through, chamfered edges, and the steel pipe simply pressed in. no signs of the housing being casted over the steel pipe.

we'll see if it leaks on the day :p
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
the old coolant tank was beginning to suffer from the classic brittle plastic.
a customer at work managed to obtain a spare tank before the car was scrapped and said just have it for free, awesome! :D

IMAG0903.jpg
IMAG0910.jpg


it was in solid condition which was a bonus but was abit dirty/gunky and brushes obviously can't reach everywhere.
soon found a trick to 1/2 fill it with washing powder, warm water, some rice & after a good shake & rinse, it was clean as a whistle :cool:

IMAG0911.jpg


drilled out the trap-door oil pickup to swap to the new sump

IMAG0914.jpg


welded in place

IMAG0919.jpg
IMAG0920.jpg


detached the enclosures pop rivets for access to clean out the sump

IMAG0923.jpg


cut the obstructing bump off the sump

IMAG0931.jpg


welded the new flat piece on

IMAG0933.jpg
IMAG0934.jpg
IMAG0935.jpg


primed & painted the engine cover, sanded the letters before laquering :cool::cool:

IMAG0917.jpg
IMAG0924.jpg
IMAG0936.jpg
IMAG0939.jpg


few stainless pipes arrived for making the coolant return pipe

IMAG0940.jpg
 
OP
OP
pollyp

pollyp

Club Member
rather than have the turbo drain hole sitting flush to the sump wall where the oil could slosh forward & up the sump during hard braking, pushing into the drain hose which could disrupt the turbo oil drainage flow, I machined an extension to drain further within the middle of the sump so the sloshing simply flows around the tube

IMAG0941.jpg
IMAG0942.jpg
IMAG0944.jpg


welded from the inside so the AN fitting & threads remain clean

IMAG0945.jpg
IMAG0947.jpg
IMAG0948.jpg


swapped the machined spark plug tube collars over to the new head so that the engine cover seals tighter & better

IMAG0949.jpg
IMAG0951.jpg


fresh engine cover fitted :cool:

IMAG0952.jpg
IMAG0953.jpg
IMAG0954.jpg
IMAG0955.jpg


after cleaning & painting the sump, I attached these rubber bits under the trap-door oil pickup for sealing the chamber. far safer than the old method using tigerseal which could've dislodged in the hot oil and cause big issues

IMAG0956.jpg
IMAG0957.jpg


wirebrush the manifold sparkly :cool::cool:

IMAG0958.jpg
IMAG0959.jpg


since I'm using an external GTIR MAF and have a spare micra TB, I can delete the MAF element from this old TB for better flow.
totally stripped apart the TB

IMAG0961.jpg
IMAG0962.jpg


the circuit board on these preface TB was screwed, soldered & glued securely onto the casing

IMAG0963.jpg


the MAF element is simply secured by the glued circuit board and an o-ring seal

IMAG0964.jpg
IMAG0966.jpg


the circuits & MOSFET are attached to this steel backplate as a heatsink

IMAG0968.jpg
IMAG0969.jpg


chopped off the useless old waxstat

IMAG0971.jpg


figured I could fit the TB on my lathe :D

IMAG0972.jpg


initially machined the top opening alot neater than before :)
will soon enlarge the bore with a bigger butterfly from 45mm to 50mm

IMAG0984.jpg
 
Top